14 (Peruvian)

List by: itisclaudio, created: 02 Dec 2019, updated: 13 Dec 2019 Public: Users can add dishes

List of typical desserts you find in Peruvian cuisine.

1. Suspiro Limeno

suspiro limeño, Suspiro de limeña, Suspiro a la limeña (Peruvian)

This classic dessert dates back to 18th-century in Peru and translates to "sigh of a woman from Lima." It's made from a creamy manjar blanco (dulce de leche) caramel base, topped with a huge dollop of Italian meringue (whipped egg whites with sugar), perfumed with port and cinnamon, and served in individually portioned glasses. Sugar atop sugar, it's only for those with an insatiable sweet tooth.

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2. Tres Leches Cake

Torta De Tres Leches, Pan Tres Leches (Mexican)

Tres Leches Cake is a sponge cake soaked in three kinds of milk: evaporated milk, condensed milk, and heavy cream. This creamy sponge cake highlights three kinds of dairy—evaporated milk, condensed milk, and cream.

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3. Picarones

Buñuelos (Peruvian)

Imagine the lovechild of a spice cake, a pumpkin pie, and a beignet, and you'll get an idea of Peru's picarones, which date back to Peru's colonial days. Potatoes are everywhere in Peru—more than 3,800 varieties are grown there—so even the desserts are papa-packed. In this case, camote, a type of sweet potato, is mixed with macre, a type of squash, to form a silky purée. It's combined with flour, sugar, yeast, and anise, formed into a round doughnut shape and deep fried. The light and airy sweets are then drizzled in chancaca (chopped raw sugar dissolved in hot water …

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4. Pionono

(Argentine) (Colombian) (Cuban) (...)

In various South American countries such as Argentina, Uruguay, Venezuela, Colombia, Peru and Cuba, piononos are prepared using a dough made of flour, eggs, and sugar, which is baked in a thin sheet then rolled around a filling of dulce de leche sometimes with walnuts, or fruits like strawberries with chantilly cream, or in the case of savoury piononos with York ham, cheese, tomato and mayonnaise, or a savory salad, such as ham salad with asparagus and lettuce, chicken salad or even tuna. In Cuba and in several other countries it is also called "Brazo de Gitano" or "Brazo Gitano". …

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5. Arroz Con Leche

(Peruvian)

Traditional rice pudding made with milk, sugar, orange peel, raisins, cloves, sweetened condensed milk, cinnamon, and vanilla and sometimes shredded coconut and (more rarely) brazil nuts can be added. It is commonly consumed with mazamorra morada (purple corn pudding). When served with it is known as "clasico".

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6. Alfajor

Alfajores, Chilean oreo (Argentine) (Filipino) (-Latin American-) (...)

Alfajor is two round, sweet biscuits made of wheat flour or cornstarch joined together with dulce de leche (known as "manjar blanco" in Peru), and optionally coated with powder sugar. More modern "industrial" varieties in Chile, Uruguay, and Argentina, are coated with dark or white chocolate (many alfajores are sold in "black" and "white" versions), or simply covered with powdered sugar. These are also known as a Chilean Oreo. One variation is called "alfajor de nieve" (snow alfajor) and has a white coating consisting of a mixture of egg whites and sugar. Most alfajores come packaged in aluminum foil. Alfajores …

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7. Turron De Dona Pepa

Turrón De Doña Pepa (Peruvian)

Traditional Peruvian dessert sold and served in Lima (Capital of Peru) in October during Señor de Los Milagros procession.

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8. Teja De Pecana

Tejas (Peruvian)

A teja is a dumpling-shaped confection from the Ica Region of Peru. It contains manjar blanco filling (similar to dulce de leche) and either dried fruits or nuts. The exterior is usually a sugar-based fondant-like shell, but there also exists chocolate versions too (known by the blend chocotejas)

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9. Chocoteja

(Peruvian)

Tejas covered in chocolate, instead of the traditional fondant

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10. Clasico

Combinado (Peruvian)

This popular Peruvian desert is the combination of two of the most traditional deserts "Mazamorra Morada" and "Arroz con Leche" served together.

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11. Helado De Lucuma

Lucuma Ice Cream (Peruvian)

Lucuma is a delicately flavored tropical fruit native to the cool highlands of coastal valleys in Peru. With its high nutritional value, it has been an important crop since ancestral times, proven by the many ceramic remains from the Moche and later Inca cultures alluding to this great fruit. In fact, it was once referred to as the Gold of the Incas. It’s tasty flavor and aroma are hard to describe or compare to any other. Some may say it tastes like caramel custard and others a bit like pumpkin. Its texture, unlike most fruits, is dry, quite starchy and …

(Added by: itisclaudio)



12. Mazamorra Morada

Purple Corn Pudding (Peruvian)

Peruvian dessert made from purple corn and fruit. It's thickened into a pudding-like texture with potato flour or corn starch, and spiced with cinnamon and cloves. It tastes a bit like blackberry pie filling, but more exotic. Mazamorra has a beautiful deep purple (morada) color, and is usually served cold. Chicha morada is a popular Peruvian beverage that is also made from purple corn. The two dishes can be made from one pot of corn - the first boiling is for the mazamorra and the second is to make chicha. Dried purple corn can be found at latin food markets …

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13. Raspadilla

(Peruvian)

Shaved ice with flavor or fruit syrup dripped on top. Popular in the summer months.

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14. Cremolada

(Peruvian)

A Cremolada is something between an ice cream and a flavorful fruit drink; comparable to slush, but made with lots of fresh fruit pulp, water and sugar. Often serve in a plastic beaker it's eaten with a spoon and sipped. As Cremoladas (the short form of crema helada – frozen crème) are quenching thirst perfectly while being refreshingly cold, they are very popular on hot summer days not only in Lima. Cremoladas come in numerous flavors and colors. Using the enormous variety of fresh Peruvian fruits there is no need for flavor enhancers or colorants. And while in Peru cremoladas …

(Added by: itisclaudio)