GET /api/cuisines/?format=api&page=3
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{
    "count": 211,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?format=api&page=4",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?format=api&page=2",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Cameroonian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cameroon",
            "description": "Cameroonian cuisine is one of the most varied in Africa due to its location on the crossroads between the north, west, and centre of the continent; the diversity in ethnicity with mixture ranging from Bantus, Semi-bantus and Shua-Arabs. Added to this is the influence of German colonialisation and later the French and English annexation of different parts of the country.\nThe soil of most of the country is very fertile and a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, both domestic and imported species, are grown. These include:\n\ncassava\nplantain\npeanuts\nfufu\nhot pepper/Penja white pepper\ncorn\neggplant\nokra\nbitterleaf\ntomato\ncocoyam\nbananas",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/cameroonian/",
            "dishes_count": 11,
            "pictures_count": 10
        },
        {
            "name": "Canadian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Canada",
            "description": "Cuisine from Canada varies widely depending on the regions of the nation. The three earliest cuisines of Canada have First Nations, English, Scottish and French roots, with the traditional cuisine of English Canada closely related to British cuisine, while the traditional cuisine of French Canada has evolved from French cuisine and the winter provisions of fur traders. With subsequent waves of immigration in the 19th and 20th century from Central, Southern, and Eastern Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and the Caribbean, the regional cuisines were subsequently augmented.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/canadian/",
            "dishes_count": 36,
            "pictures_count": 36
        },
        {
            "name": "Canarian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Canary Islands",
            "description": "It refers to the typical dishes and ingredients in the cuisine of the Canary Islands, and it constitutes an important element in the culture of its inhabitants. Its main features are its freshness, variety, simplicity, and the richness of its ingredients (which may be a result of the long geographical isolation the islands suffered), the mix of seafood and meat dishes, its cultural influences and the low knowledge of it by the rest of the world.\n\nMany small dishes are presented in the Canary Islands as appetizers, or snacks (tapas), which are known locally as enyesques.\n\nMojo (pronounced mO-ho) is a sauce served with many dishes, which is made mainly of oil, garlic, vinegar, salt, red pepper, thyme, cumin, coriander and several other spices. The two main kinds of mojo are rojo (red, often served with meat) and verde (green, often served with fish), though both can be served with potatoes. Spicy red mojo is called mojo picón. This recipe is the base of the mojos of Latin America, especially Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela, due to heavy Canarian emigration, and have also influenced the cuisines of the non-Hispanic Caribbean islands.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canarian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/canarian/",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Cape Verdean",
            "othernames": "Cabo Verde",
            "territory": "Cape Verde",
            "description": "The cuisine of Cape Verde is a West African cuisine largely influenced by Portuguese, Southern and Western European and West African cuisine. Cape Verde was a colony of Portugal from its colonization until 1975.One of the most important aspects of Cape Verdean culture is the beverage grogue, a strong rum made from distilled sugar cane on the islands of Santo Antao and Santiago. The beverage is made in towns such as Paul on Santo Antao and Cidade Velha on Santiago using a trapiche. A variation of the drink is ponche (punch) which is sweeted with condensed milk or sugarcane molasses. Due to the intoxication on consuming grogue, it is consumed by many Cape Verdean musicians seeking inspiration.\r\n\r\nCorn and beans are staples of Cape Verdean cuisine.Also popular are rice, fried potatoes, cassava and vegetables such as carrots, kale, squash, fish and meat such as tuna, sawfish, lobster, chicken, grilled pork and eggs. One legacy of the Portuguese on the islands is olives and Alentejo wines which are still imported. One type of Cape Verdean stew is a cachupa .",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/cape_verdean/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "-Caribbean-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago, Bahamas, Barbados, Saint Lucia",
            "description": "Of or relating to the Caribbean Sea, its islands, or its Central or South American coasts or to the peoples or cultures of this region.\n\nTop Caribbean Countries by population:\n- Cuba\n- Haiti\n- Dominican Republic\n- Puerto Rico\n- Jamaica\n- Trinidad and Tobago\n- Guadeloupe\n- Martinique\n- Bahamas\n- Barbados\n- Saint Lucia\n- Curacao\n- Aruba\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/-caribbean-/",
            "dishes_count": 19,
            "pictures_count": 21
        },
        {
            "name": "Catalan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Catalonia",
            "description": "It is the cuisine of the autonomous community of Catalonia. It relies heavily on ingredients popular along the Mediterranean coast, including fresh vegetables (especially tomato, garlic, eggplant (aubergine), capsicum, and artichoke), wheat products (bread, pasta), Arbequina olive oils, wines, legumes (beans, chickpeas), mushrooms, all sorts of pork preparations (sausage from Vic, ham), all sorts of cheese, poultry, lamb, and many types of fish like sardine, anchovy, tuna, and cod.\n\nThe traditional Catalan cuisine is quite diverse, ranging from pork-intensive dishes cooked in the inland part of the region (Catalonia is one of the main producers of swine products in Spain) to fish-based recipes along the coast.\n\nThe cuisine includes many preparations that mix sweet and savoury and stews with sauces based upon botifarra (pork sausage) and the characteristic picada (ground almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, etc. sometimes with garlic, herbs, biscuits)",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/catalan/",
            "dishes_count": 26,
            "pictures_count": 26
        },
        {
            "name": "Caucasian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Caucasus, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Dagestan, Chechnya, Abkhazia, Adjaria, Adygea",
            "description": "Cuisine from the geographic region Caucasus or Caucasia includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.\n\nThese cuisines provide a dash of spice and colour compared with often stodgy Russian dishes. Although often characterized as quite meat-heavy - a staple of Caucasian and Central Asian cuisine in Russia is the fabulous Shashlik (kebabs) which appear on every menu. Food from this part of the world is also a good option for vegetarian, making use of the vegetables and pulses native to that part of the world.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/caucasian/",
            "dishes_count": 12,
            "pictures_count": 14
        },
        {
            "name": "Chadian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Chad",
            "description": "Chadian cuisine is the cooking traditions, practices, foods and dishes associated with the Republic of Chad. Chadians use a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits and meats. Commonly consumed grains include millet, sorghum, and rice as staple foods. Commonly eaten vegetables include okra and cassava. A variety of fruits are also eaten. Meats include mutton, chicken, pork, goat, fish, lamb and beef. The day's main meal is typically consumed in the evening on a large communal plate, with men and women usually eating in separate areas. This meal is typically served on the ground upon a mat, with people sitting and eating around it.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/chadian/",
            "dishes_count": 6,
            "pictures_count": 6
        },
        {
            "name": "Chilean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Chile",
            "description": "Cuisine from Chile stems mainly from the combination of traditional Spanish cuisine, Chilean Indigenous Mapuche culture and local ingredients, with later important influences from other European cuisines, particularly from Germany, Italy and France. The food tradition and recipes in Chile are notable for the variety of flavours and ingredients, with the country’s diverse geography and climate hosting a wide range of agricultural produce, fruits and vegetables. The long coastline and the peoples' relationship with the Pacific Ocean add an immense array of seafood products to Chilean cuisine, with the country's waters home to unique species of fish, molluscs, crustaceans and algae, thanks to the oxygen-rich water carried in by the Humboldt Current. Chile is also one of the world’s largest producers of wine and many Chilean recipes are enhanced and accompanied by local wines.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/chilean/",
            "dishes_count": 58,
            "pictures_count": 81
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Chinese cuisine is the national cuisine of China.\n\nChinese cuisine includes styles originating from the diverse regions of China, as well as from Chinese people in other parts of the world. The history of Chinese cuisine in China stretches back for thousands of years and has changed from period to period and in each region according to climate, imperial fashions, and local preferences. Over time, techniques and ingredients from the cuisines of other cultures were integrated into the cuisine of the Chinese people due both to imperial expansion and from the trade with nearby regions in pre-modern times, and from Europe and the New World in the modern period.\n\nStyles and tastes also varied by class, region, and ethnic background. This led to an unparalleled range of ingredients, techniques, dishes and eating styles in what could be called Chinese food, leading Chinese to pride themselves on eating a wide variety of foods while remaining true to the spirit and traditions of Chinese food culture.\n\nWiki",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese/",
            "dishes_count": 201,
            "pictures_count": 244
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese-Cantonese",
            "othernames": "Yue",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Cantonese Cuisine, also known as Yue Cuisine, is the culinary style of Guangdong Province, which was called Canton when the Wade-Giles romanization of Chinese was in use. This particular type of Chinese food has been popularized by Chinese restaurants around the world as the majority of those who set up these restaurants were of Cantonese origin.\n\nGuangdong dishes are characterized by their tender and slightly sweet taste. Sauces are a crucial seasoning in Guangdong cuisine. Classic Cantonese sauces are light and mellow. The most widely used sauces in Guangdong Cuisine include: hoisin sauce, oyster sauce, plum sauce and sweet and sour sauce. Other ingredients popular in Guangdong Cuisine include spring onions, sugar, salt, soya bean products, rice wine, corn starch, vinegar and sesame oil. Garlic is used heavily in some dishes, especially those in which internal organs, such as entrails, may emit unpleasant odors. Ginger, chili peppers, five-spice powder, powdered white pepper, star anise and a few other spices are used, but often sparingly.\n\nThe raw materials for Guangdong Cuisine are very plentiful. \"The Chinese eat everything with four legs, except tables, and everything that flies except airplanes\" is the most suitable expression of the countless variety of Guangdong food. Things that are rarely eaten or rarely seen on Western tables are commonly used in Guangdong dishes. Snake, cat and pangolin (scaly anteater) are considered by the Cantonese people to be most delicious food.\n\nIn contrast to the fast-fried cooking method of Sichuan dishes, Guangdong people prefer to braise, stew and sauté their food. These cooking methods aim to preserve the flavor of the dishes. http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/chinese-food/yue-cuisine.htm\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese-cantonese/",
            "dishes_count": 15,
            "pictures_count": 18
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese-Shanghainese",
            "othernames": "Hu",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Shanghai cuisine, also known as Hu cuisine, is popular style of Chinese food. In a narrow sense, Shanghai cuisine refers only to what is traditionally called Benbang cuisine (???, lit. \"local cuisine\") which originated in Shanghai; in a broad sense,it refers to complex and developed styles of cooking under profound influence of those of the surrounding provinces – Jiangsu and Zhejiang –. It takes \"color, aroma and taste\" as its elements like other Chinese regional cuisines, and emphasizes in particular the use of seasonings,the quality of raw materials and original flavors. \nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese-shanghainese/",
            "dishes_count": 12,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese-Sichuan",
            "othernames": "Szechwan, Szechuan",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Style of Chinese cuisine originating from Sichuan province in southwestern China. It has bold flavours, particularly the pungency and spiciness resulting from liberal use of garlic and chili peppers, as well as the unique flavor of the Sichuan pepper. There are many local variations within Sichuan province and the Chongqing municipality, which was part of Sichuan until 1997. Four sub-styles include Chongqing, Chengdu, Zigong, and Buddhist vegetarian style.\n\nUNESCO declared Chengdu to be a city of gastronomy in 2011 in order to recognize the sophistication of its cooking. (Wikipedia)",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese-sichuan/",
            "dishes_count": 19,
            "pictures_count": 25
        },
        {
            "name": "Circassian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Circassia",
            "description": "Adyghe cuisine consists of many different traditional dishes, varying by season. The summertime traditional dishes are mainly dairy products and vegetables.In winter and spring, the traditional dishes mostly consist of flour and meat. Traditional dishes include ficcin, seasoned chicken or turkey with sauce, boiled mutton and beef with a seasoning of sour milk along with salt and crushed garlic.\n\nAmong the many varieties of cheese in the North Caucasus, Circassian cheese is the most popular one.\n\nDifferent variants of pasta can be found in Circassia, one such type is the manti that is filled with potato or lamb, and served with butter, yoghurt, and spices. Manti is similar to ravioli, but it is served with butter and yoghurt, though sometimes tomato can be added as well. Manti may be fried, as well as boiled.\n\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circassian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/circassian/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Colombian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Colombia",
            "description": "Colombian cuisine includes the cooking traditions and practices of Colombia's Caribbean shoreline, Pacific coast, mountains, jungle, and ranchlands. Colombian cuisine varies regionally and is influenced by the Indigenous Chibcha, Spanish, African, Arab and some Asian influences. Colombian coffee is renowned for its high quality. (Wiki)",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/colombian/",
            "dishes_count": 59,
            "pictures_count": 76
        },
        {
            "name": "Congolese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Democratic Republic Of The Congo",
            "description": "The cuisine of the Democratic Republic of the Congo varies widely, representing the food of indigenous people. Cassava is generally the staple food usually eaten with other side dishes. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/congolese/",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Costa Rican",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Costa Rica",
            "description": "Costa Rican cuisine is known for being fairly mild, with high reliance on fresh fruits and vegetables. Rice and black beans are a staple of most traditional Costa Rican meals, often served three times a day.\n\nCosta Rican fare is nutritionally well rounded, and nearly always cooked from scratch from fresh ingredients. Traditional meals have a home-cooked, comforting feel to them. Due to the tropical location of the country, there are many exotic fruits and vegetables readily available and included in the local cuisine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Costa_Rican_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/costa_rican/",
            "dishes_count": 17,
            "pictures_count": 21
        },
        {
            "name": "Crimean Tatars",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Crimean Tatars",
            "description": "The traditional cuisine of the Crimean Tatars derives basically from the same roots as the cuisine of the Volga Tatars, although unlike the Volga Tatars they do not eat horse meat and do not drink mare’s milk (kymyz). However, the Crimean Tatars adopted many Uzbek dishes during their exile in Central Asia since 1944, and these dishes have been absorbed into Crimean Tatar national cuisine after their return to Crimea. Uzbek samsa, laghman, and plov (pilaf) are sold in most Tatar roadside cafes in Crimea as national dishes. Uzbek flatbread, nan (or lepyoshka in Russian), is also a staple among Crimean Tatars.\n\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crimean_Tatar_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/crimean_tatars/",
            "dishes_count": 0,
            "pictures_count": 0
        },
        {
            "name": "Croatian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Croatia",
            "description": "It is heterogeneous and is known as a cuisine of the regions since every region of Croatia has its own distinct culinary tradition. Its roots date back to ancient times. The differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable among those in the mainland and those in coastal regions. Mainland cuisine is more characterized by the earlier Slavic and the more recent contacts with neighbouring cultures—Hungarian and Turkish, using lard for cooking, and spices such as black pepper, paprika, and garlic. The coastal region bears the influences of the Greek and Roman cuisine, as well as of the later Mediterranean cuisine, in particular Italian (especially Venetian). Coastal cuisines use olive oil, and herbs and spices such as rosemary, sage, bay leaf, oregano, marjoram, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, and lemon and orange rind. Peasant cooking traditions are based on imaginative variations of several basic ingredients (cereals, dairy products, meat, fish, vegetables, nuts) and cooking procedures (stewing, grilling, roasting, baking), while bourgeois cuisine involves more complicated procedures and use of selected herbs and spices. Charcuterie is part of Croatian tradition in all regions. Food and recipes from other former Yugoslav countries are also popular in Croatia.\n\nCroatian cuisine can be divided into a few regional cuisines (Istria, Dalmatia, Dubrovnik, Lika, Gorski Kotar, Zagorje, Međimurje, Podravina, Slavonija) which all have their specific cooking traditions, characteristic for the area and not necessarily well known in other parts of Croatia. Most dishes, however, can be found all across the country, with local variants.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/croatian/",
            "dishes_count": 31,
            "pictures_count": 31
        },
        {
            "name": "Cuban",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cuba",
            "description": "Cuban cuisine is a fusion of Native American Taino food, Spanish, African, and Caribbean cuisines. Some Cuban recipes share spices and techniques with Spanish and African cooking, with some Caribbean influence in spice and flavor. This results in a unique, interesting and flavorful blend of the several different cultural influences, with strong similarities with the cuisine of the neighboring Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. A small but noteworthy Chinese influence can also be accounted for, mainly in the Havana area. During colonial times, Cuba was an important port for trade, and many Spaniards who lived there brought their culinary traditions along with them.\n\n\nAs a result of the colonization of Cuba by Spain, one of the main influences on the cuisine is from Spain. Along with Spain, other culinary influences include Africa, from the Africans that were brought to Cuba as slaves, and French, from the French colonists that came to Cuba from Haiti.Another important factor is that Cuba itself is an island, making seafood something that greatly influences Cuban cuisine. Another contributing factor to Cuban cuisine is the fact that Cuba is in a tropical climate. The tropical climate produces fruits and root vegetables that are used in Cuban dishes and meals\n\nWiki",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/cuban/",
            "dishes_count": 38,
            "pictures_count": 63
        }
    ]
}