GET /api/cuisines/?format=api&page=11
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{
    "count": 211,
    "next": null,
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?format=api&page=10",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Ukrainian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ukraine",
            "description": "Cuisine of the people of Ukraine has had a number of influences including Russian, Polish, German and Turkish. Popular ingredients in the cuisine of Ukraine are meat, mushrooms, vegetables, berries, fruit and herbs. As Ukrainians are extremely hospitable their meals are served in very generous quantities.\n\nSome of the best Ukrainian cuisine is actually very simple. Many ingredients are used in what some mayit fo consider unusual combinations, creating a unique and sumptuous dish. Considered the “breadbasket of Europe”, it follows that bread is a staple in Ukraine. There are dozens of methods used in preparing breads, which are often used in rituals and customs. Dishes often contain pickled vegetables when these are not in season and certain dishes can only be made when ingredients are available. Pastries and cakes are popular, but not very sweet.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/ukrainian/",
            "dishes_count": 22,
            "pictures_count": 22
        },
        {
            "name": "Uruguayan",
            "othernames": "Charruan",
            "territory": "Uruguay",
            "description": "The Cuisine from Uruguay is a fusion of Indigenous Charruan cuisine and the cuisines of several European countries, with a particular emphasis on Mediterranean food from Spain, Italy, Portugal and France. Other possible influences on the cuisine may result from immigration from countries such as Germany and Britain. The food is very similar to Argentine cuisine.\n\nThe base of the country's diet is meat and animal products, mostly coming from beef but also chicken, lamb, pig and sometimes fish.\n\nUruguayan gastronomy came from immigration, and surprisingly did not come from the Amerindians, because the new colonies did not trust the natives. The preferred cooking methods for meats and vegetables are still boiling and roasting, but with modernization also came frying (see milanesas and chivitos). Meanwhile, wheat and fruit comes mostly fried (torta frita and pasteles), comfited (rapadura and ticholos de banana) and sometimes baked (rosca de chicharrones), which is a new modern style.\n\nAlthough Uruguay has exuberant flora and fauna, with the exception of yerba mate, the rest of it is mostly still unused. Consumption of fresh fruit is rare, and when fruit is eaten, it is not from locally grown areas.\n\nUruguayan food always comes with fresh bread; bizcochos and tortas fritas are a must for drinking with mate ('tomar el mate').",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/uruguayan/",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "Uzbek",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Uzbekistan",
            "description": "Uzbek cuisine is influenced by local agriculture, as in most nations. There is a great deal of grain farming in Uzbekistan, so breads and noodles are of importance, and Uzbek cuisine has been characterized as \"noodle-rich\".[1] Mutton is a popular variety of meat due to the abundance of sheep in the country and it is a part of various Uzbek dishes.\n\nUzbekistan's signature dish is palov (plov or osh or \"pilaf\"), a main course typically made with rice, pieces of meat, grated carrots and onions. It is usually cooked in a kazan (or deghi) over an open fire; chickpeas, raisins, barberries, or fruit may be added for variation. Although often prepared at home for family and guests by the head of household or the housewife, palov is made on special occasions by the oshpaz, or the osh master chef, who cooks the national dish over an open flame, sometimes serving up to 1,000 people from a single cauldron on holidays or occasions such as weddings. Oshi nahor, or \"morning plov\", is served in the early morning (between 6 and 9 am) to large gatherings of guests, typically as part of an ongoing wedding celebration.\n\nOther notable national dishes include: shurpa (shurva or shorva), a soup made of large pieces of fatty meat (usually mutton) and fresh vegetables; norin and lagman, noodle-based dishes that may be served as a soup or a main course; manti (also called qasqoni), chuchvara, and somsa, stuffed pockets of dough served as an appetizer or a main course; dimlama (a meat and vegetable stew) and various kebabs, usually served as a main course.\n\nGreen tea is the national hot beverage taken throughout the day; teahouses (chaikhanas) are of cultural importance. The more usual black tea is preferred in Tashkent. Both are typically taken without milk or sugar. Tea always accompanies a meal, but it is also a drink of hospitality, automatically offered green or black to every guest. Ayran, a chilled yogurt drink, is popular in the summer, but does not replace hot tea.\n\nThe use of alcohol is less widespread than in the west, but wine is comparatively popular for a Muslim nation as Uzbekistan is largely secular. Uzbekistan has 14 wineries, the oldest and most famous being the Khovrenko Winery in Samarkand (est. 1927). The Samarkand Winery produces a range of dessert wines from local grape varieties: Gulyakandoz, Shirin, Aleatiko, and Kabernet likernoe (literally Cabernet dessert wine in Russian). Uzbek wines have received international awards and are exported to Russia and other countries in Central Asia.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uzbek_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/uzbek/",
            "dishes_count": 8,
            "pictures_count": 8
        },
        {
            "name": "Vanuatu",
            "othernames": "Ni-Vanuatu",
            "territory": "Vanuatu",
            "description": "This cuisine incorporates fish, root vegetables such as taro and yams, fruits, and vegetables. Most island families grow food in their gardens, and food shortages are rare. Papayas, pineapples, mangoes, plantains, and sweet potatoes are abundant through much of the year. Coconut milk and cream are used to flavor many dishes. Most food is cooked using hot stones or through boiling and steaming; little food is fried. Since Vanuatu is one of the few South Pacific regions influenced by the outside world, Vanuatu's food has a multicultural nature",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/vanuatu/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Venezuelan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Venezuela",
            "description": "Due to its location in the world, its diversity of industrial resources and the cultural diversity of the Venezuelan people, Venezuelan cuisine often varies greatly from one region to another. Its cuisine, traditional as well as modern, is influenced by indigenous peoples and its European ancestry (Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, and French), and is also influenced by African and Native American traditions. Food staples include corn, rice, plantain, yams, beans and several meats. Potatoes, tomatoes, onions, eggplants, squashes and zucchini are also common sides in the Venezuelan diet.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/venezuelan/",
            "dishes_count": 36,
            "pictures_count": 47
        },
        {
            "name": "Vietnamese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Vietnam",
            "description": "Vietnamese cuisine encompasses the foods and beverages of Vietnam, and features a combination of five fundamental tastes (Vietnamese: ngu v?) in the overall meal. Each Vietnamese dish has a distinctive flavor which reflects one or more of these elements. Common ingredients include fish sauce, shrimp paste, soy sauce, rice, fresh herbs, and fruits and vegetables. Vietnamese recipes use lemongrass, ginger, mint, Vietnamese mint, long coriander, Saigon cinnamon, bird's eye chili, lime, and basil leaves. \n\nTraditional Vietnamese cooking is greatly admired for its fresh ingredients, minimal use of oil, and reliance on herbs and vegetables. With the balance between fresh herbs and meats and a selective use of spices to reach a fine taste, Vietnamese food is considered one of the healthiest cuisines worldwide. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vietnamese_cuisine\n\nCanh = Soup\nCơm = cooked rice\nCuốn = Roll\nGỏi = Salad\nNuong = Grilled\nTom = Shrimp\ntrứng hấp = Steamed egg",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/vietnamese/",
            "dishes_count": 49,
            "pictures_count": 61
        },
        {
            "name": "Welsh",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Wales",
            "description": "Welsh cuisine encompasses the cooking traditions and practices of the country of Wales and the Welsh people. Whilst there are a large number of dishes that can be considered Welsh due to their ingredients and/or history, dishes such as cawl, Welsh rarebit, laverbread, Welsh cakes, bara brith and the Glamorgan sausage have all been regarded as symbols of Welsh food. There is some variation in dishes around Wales, but the most pronounced difference is in the Gower Peninsula, an isolated rural area which was heavily influenced by Somerset and Devon. There the dishes created included whitepot and often incorporated pumpkin.\n\nWhile Wales has imported throughout the centuries some culinary practices and dishes from its British neighbors, uniquely Welsh cuisine grew largely from the lives of the Welsh working folk, such as farmers, shepherds, and peasants, as these Welsh working people tended to be more isolated from outside culinary influences. Welsh common folk were instead influenced by the food that they could produce based on what little ingredients they could produce or afford, all while having little or no contact with neighboring English cuisine and English society. Welsh Celts and their more recent Welsh descendants originally practiced transhumance, moving their cattle to higher elevations in the summer and back to their home base in the winter. Once they settled to homesteads, a family would have generally eaten meat from a pig primarily, keeping a cow for dairy products. Vegetables beyond cabbages and leeks were rare.\n\nIn Wales, beef and dairy cattle are raised widely. Sheep farming, however, is extensive in the country, and lamb is the meat traditionally associated with Wales. Other important produce includes seafood—especially close to the coast, where fishing culture is strong and fisheries are common. This is exemplified by the use of cockles and laverbread in Welsh cuisine. The leek, the country's national vegetable, is also used frequently in Welsh cuisine. Since the 1970s, the rise of the gastropub and high-end restaurants has given Wales five Michelin-starred restaurants.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welsh_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/welsh/",
            "dishes_count": 19,
            "pictures_count": 19
        },
        {
            "name": "-Worldwide-",
            "othernames": "Global",
            "territory": "",
            "description": "We include in global cuisine dishes that are present in almost every region of the glove. Most of these dishes were originated a long time ago by ancient cultures and are the base of new dishes",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/-worldwide-/",
            "dishes_count": 159,
            "pictures_count": 168
        },
        {
            "name": "Yemeni",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Yemen",
            "description": "Yemeni cuisine is entirely distinct from the more widely known Middle Eastern cuisines, and even differs slightly from region to region. Throughout history, Yemeni cuisine has had a little bit of Ottoman influence in some parts of the north, and very little Mughlai-style Indian influence in Aden and the surrounding areas in the south, but these influences have only come within the last 300 years. \nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yemeni_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/yemeni/",
            "dishes_count": 30,
            "pictures_count": 32
        },
        {
            "name": "Zambian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Zambia",
            "description": "Zambian cuisine is heavily centered around nshima, which is a food prepared from pounded white maize. Nshima is part of nearly every Zambian meal. In addition to nshima, Zambian cuisine includes various types of stew, cooked vegetables and different types of beer. Dried fish and insects are also eaten. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/zambian/",
            "dishes_count": 13,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Zimbabwean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Zimbabwe",
            "description": "Zimbabwean cuisine, like that of many other African nations, is based largely on staple ingredients like maize meal. A popular, hearty dinner is pap (maize meal cooked into a porridge-like consistency) with vegetable gravy and meat. This delicious food can be found all over the country for reasonable prices. Bars and clubs, however, are only common in the large city centers.\nhttps://www.iexplore.com/articles/travel-guides/africa/zimbabwe/food-and-restaurants",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/zimbabwean/",
            "dishes_count": 12,
            "pictures_count": 12
        }
    ]
}