GET /api/cuisines/?page=9
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{
    "count": 211,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=10",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=8",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Peruvian-Japanese",
            "othernames": "Nikkei",
            "territory": "Peru, Japan",
            "description": "Peruvian Japanese fusion cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/peruvian-japanese/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Polish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Poland",
            "description": "Polish cuisine is a style of cooking and food preparation originating in or widely popular in Poland.  Meat is an important part of the Polish diet. Pork is the most popular meat, and the most commonly eaten meat dish is a fried, breaded pork cutlet served with thick sauce. Beef, ham, and sausage are also eaten regularly. The meat stew called bigos is often called the national dish of Poland. Other famous Polish dishes are golabki (cabbage leaves stuffed with ground meat and rice) and golonka (fresh ham served with horse-radish). Poles also like to eat smoked and pickled fish, especially herring.\n\nMost Polish meals start with one of Poland's many soups. These range from clear broth to thick soup so hearty it could be a meal in itself. The best known is the beet soup called borscht.\n\nPoles love desserts, especially cakes. Popular cakes include cheesecake, sponge cake, poppy seed cake, and a pound cake called babka. Special cakes are baked for feast days and weddings.\n\nPopular beverages include coffee, tea, milk, buttermilk, and fruit syrup and water. However, vodka distilled from rye is known as the national drink.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/polish/",
            "dishes_count": 32,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "Portuguese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Portugal",
            "description": "The Cuisine from Portugal despite being relatively restricted to an Atlantic sustenance, Portuguese cuisine has many Mediterranean influences. Portuguese cuisine is famous for seafood. The influence of Portugal's former colonial possessions is also notable, especially in the wide variety of spices used. These spices include piri piri (small, fiery chili peppers) and black pepper, as well as cinnamon, vanilla and saffron. Olive oil is one of the bases of Portuguese cuisine, which is used both for cooking and flavouring meals. Garlic is widely used, as are herbs, such as bay leaf and parsley.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/portuguese/",
            "dishes_count": 54,
            "pictures_count": 62
        },
        {
            "name": "Puerto Rican",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Puerto Rico",
            "description": "Puerto rican cuisine has its roots in the cooking traditions and practices of europe (spain), africa and the native taínos. in the latter part of the 19th century, the cuisine of puerto rico was greatly influenced by the united states in the ingredients used in its preparation. puerto rican cuisine has transcended the boundaries of the island, and can be found in several countries outside the archipelago.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/puerto_rican_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/puerto_rican/",
            "dishes_count": 40,
            "pictures_count": 59
        },
        {
            "name": "-Punjabi-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Punjab, India",
            "description": "Punjabi cuisine is associated with food from the Punjab region of India and Pakistan. This cuisine has a rich tradition of many distinct and local ways of cooking. One is a special form of tandoori cooking style that is now famous in other parts of India, UK, Canada and in many parts of the world.\n\nThe local cuisine of Punjab is heavily influenced by the agriculture and farming lifestyle prevalent from the times of the ancient Harappan Civilization. Locally grown staple foods form the major part of the local cuisine. Distinctively Punjabi cuisine is known for its rich, buttery flavours along with the extensive vegetarian and meat dishes. Main dishes include Sarson da saag and makki di roti.\n\nBasmati rice is the indigenous variety of Punjab and many varieties of rice dishes have been developed with this variety. The cooked rice is known as Chol in the Punjabi language. Many vegetable and meat based dishes are developed for this type of rice",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/-punjabi-/",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "Qatari",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Qatar",
            "description": "Qatari cuisine is made up of traditional Arab cuisine. Machbūs, a meal consisting of rice, meat, and vegetables, is the national dish in Qatar, typically made with either lamb or chicken and is slow-cooked to give it a depth of flavour. Seafood and dates are staple food items in the country. Many of these dishes are also used in other countries in the region because they share many commonalities. In other parts of the region, some of the dishes have different names or use slightly different ingredients. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Qatari_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/qatari/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Romanian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Romania",
            "description": "Food from Romania is a diverse blend of different dishes from several traditions with which it has come into contact, but it also maintains its own character. It has been greatly influenced by Ottoman cuisine, while it also includes influences from the cuisines of other neighbours, including German, Serbian, Bulgarian, and Hungarian cuisine.\n\nThere are quite a few different types of dishes, which are sometimes included under a generic term; for example, the category ciorbă includes a wide range of soups with a characteristic sour taste. These may be meat and vegetable soups, tripe (ciorbă de burtă) and calf foot soups, or fish soups, all of which are soured by lemon juice, sauerkraut juice, vinegar, or borș (traditionally made from bran). The category țuică (plum brandy) is a generic name for a strong alcoholic spirit in Romania, while in other countries, every flavour has a different name.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/romanian/",
            "dishes_count": 54,
            "pictures_count": 53
        },
        {
            "name": "Russian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Russia",
            "description": "Russian cuisine is a collection of the different cooking traditions of the Russian people. The cuisine is diverse, as Russia is by area the largest country in the world. Russian cuisine derives its varied character from the vast and multi-cultural expanse of Russia. Moreover, it is necessary to divide Russian traditional cuisine and Soviet cuisine, which has its own peculiarity. Its foundations were laid by the peasant food of the rural population in an often harsh climate, with a combination of plentiful fish, pork, poultry, caviar, mushrooms, berries, and honey. Crops of rye, wheat, barley and millet provided the ingredients for a plethora of breads, pancakes, pies, cereals, beer and vodka. Soups and stews full of flavor are centered on seasonal or storable produce, fish and meats. This wholly native food remained the staple for the vast majority of Russians well into the 20th century.\n\nRussia's great expansions of culture, influence, and interest during the 16th–18th centuries brought more refined foods and culinary techniques, as well as one of the most refined food countries in the world. It was during this period that smoked meats and fish, pastry cooking, salads and green vegetables, chocolate, ice cream, wines, and juice were imported from abroad. At least for the urban aristocracy and provincial gentry, this opened the doors for the creative integration of these new foodstuffs with traditional Russian dishes. The result is extremely varied in technique, seasoning, and combination. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/russian/",
            "dishes_count": 86,
            "pictures_count": 88
        },
        {
            "name": "Salvadorian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "El Salvador",
            "description": "Salvadorian cuisine is a style of cooking derived from the nation of el salvador. the traditional cuisine consists of food from indigenous pipil and spanish peoples. many of the dishes are made with maize (corn).\n\nel salvador's most notable dish is the pupusa, a thick handmade corn flour or rice flour tortilla stuffed with cheese, chicharrón (cooked pork meat ground to a paste consistency), refried beans, and/or loroco (a vine flower bud native to central america). there are also vegetarian options, often with ayote (a type of squash) or garlic. some adventurous restaurants even offer pupusas stuffed with shrimp or spinach which are served with salsa roja, a simple yet flavorful salvadoran cooked tomato sauce, often served with curtido. pollo encebollado is another popular salvadoran dish that contains chicken simmered with onions. famous salvadoran cheese is eaten with these meals such as queso duro (hard cheese), queso fresco (fresh cheese), and cuajada.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/salvadoran_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/salvadorian/",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 16
        },
        {
            "name": "Samoan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Samoa",
            "description": "Samoan culture has a very long and complex history which includes great migratory movements, amazing feats and the whole history of its population. One of the most important aspects of the Samoan cuisine is represented by the fact that food is not heavily spiced as it is characterised by the use of coconut milk and cream. Some of the most popular Samoan foods include taro, bananas, coconut, breadfruit, and shellfish, or pork and Chicken. A very interesting, and in the same time unique method of cooking different kinds of food includes Samoan umu, a traditional above the ground stone oven heated by glowing hot lava rocks. Thus, the food can be placed on the rocks and plaited in coconut fronds, or wrapped in banana leaves. Western Samoan inhabitants seem to be very keen on fishing, as fresh caught fish has been one of the most important Samoan dish.\n\n\nhttp://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Samoan_Cuisine\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/samoan/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Saudi Arabian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Saudi Arabia",
            "description": "The Arabian people have consumed the same type of food for thousands of years. Some of the common food items in Saudi Arabian cuisine include wheat, rice, lamb, chicken, yogurt, potatoes and dates. Traditional coffeehouses (Maqha) used to be ubiquitous, but are now being displaced by food-hall style cafes. According to the Saudi Arabian Cultural Mission, \"serving Gahwah (Coffee) in Saudi Arabia is a sign of hospitality and generosity\". Traditionally, the coffee beans were roasted, cooled and ground in front of the guests using a mortar and pestle. The host would then add cardamom pods to the coffee beans during the grinding process. Once the coffee is brewed, it is poured for guests. Today, Gahwah is not prepared in front of the guests; instead it is elegantly served in a Dallah and poured into small cups called Finjan.\n\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saudi_Arabian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/saudi_arabian/",
            "dishes_count": 8,
            "pictures_count": 7
        },
        {
            "name": "Scottish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Scotland",
            "description": "Scottish cuisine is the specific set of cooking traditions, practices and cuisines associated with Scotland. It has distinctive attributes and recipes of its own, but shares much with wider British and European cuisine as a result of local and foreign influences, both ancient and modern. Traditional Scottish dishes exist alongside international foodstuffs brought about by migration.\n\nScotland's natural larder of game, dairy products, fish, fruit, and vegetables is the chief factor in traditional Scots cooking, with a high reliance on simplicity and a lack of spices from abroad, as these were historically rare and expensive.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/scottish/",
            "dishes_count": 24,
            "pictures_count": 24
        },
        {
            "name": "Senegalese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Senegal ",
            "description": "The cuisine of Senegal is a West African cuisine influenced by North African, French, and Portuguese cuisine and derives from the nation's many ethnic groups, the largest being the Wolof. Chicken, lamb, peas, eggs, and beef are also used, but pork is not due to the nation’s largest Muslim population. Peanuts, the primary crop of Senegal, as well as couscous, white rice, sweet potatoes, lentils, black-eyed peas and various vegetables, are also incorporated into many recipes. Meats and vegetables are typically stewed or marinated in herbs and spices, and then poured over rice or couscous, or eaten with bread.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/senegalese/",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 4
        },
        {
            "name": "Serbian",
            "othernames": "Balkanian",
            "territory": "Serbia",
            "description": "The Serbian gastronomy is a strong mix of oriental, central European and local Balkan cuisines (such as Bosnia, Croatia, Montenegro, Slovenia, Macedonia), offering an overwhelming variety of meals. Besides in restaurants and kafanas (Serbian name for something like a tavern), Serbs tend to eat lots of fast food, especially grilled for lunch, and pastry for any other meal. There is also a nice variety of seafood that you’ll find, given it’s close proximity to the Mediterranean coast (Adriatic sea).\nSerbian food is mainly heavy, with plenty of calories. Meat, pastry and local vegetables dominate in Serbian cuisine.\n\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/serbian/",
            "dishes_count": 37,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "Serbian-vojvodina",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Vojvodina, Serbian Cyrillic",
            "description": "The Vojvodina is located in the north part of the Republic of Serbia. In the history, due to its geographical position, the Vojvodina has been subject to a variety of cultural, traditional and other influences.\n\nResults of different cultures mixture through the history and people who have interfered in that territory you can find on every step, but the most are in Vojvodina’s cuisine today.\nEspecially great influence on the Vojvodina’s cuisine had the Germans arrival. They have brought their customs, way of cooking, wine, words,… Famous Serbian songwriter and singer Djordje Balasevic describes on the best way Vojvodina’s cuisine in his songs today.\n\nAlso, especially large impact on the Vojvodina’s cuisine had a Serbian, Hungarian, Romanian and Slovakian cuisine, so no wonder why the tourists like to enjoy in the specific taste of Serbian cakes, Hungarian stew with onion and pepper, German steak.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/serbian-vojvodina/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Singaporean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Singapore",
            "description": "Singaporean cuisine is indicative of the ethnic diversity of the culture of Singapore which originated from Malaysia, as a product of centuries of cultural interaction owing to Singapore's strategic location. The food is influenced by the native Malay, the predominant Chinese, Indonesian, Indian, Peranakan, and Western traditions (particularly English and some Portuguese-influenced Eurasian, known as Kristang)since the founding of Singapore by the British in the nineteenth century. Influences from other areas such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, and the Middle East exist in local food culture as well. In Singaporean hawker stalls, for example, chefs of Chinese background influenced by Indian culture might experiment with condiments and ingredients such as tamarind, turmeric, and ghee, while an Indian chef might serve a fried noodle dish. With a variety of influences from different countries, it is suffice to note that the globalization phenomenon affects the cuisine in Singapore as well.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/singaporean/",
            "dishes_count": 31,
            "pictures_count": 38
        },
        {
            "name": "Slovak",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Slovakia",
            "description": "Slovak cuisine varies slightly from region to region across Slovakia. It was influenced by the traditional cuisine of its neighbours and it influenced them as well. The origins of traditional Slovak cuisine can be traced to times when the majority of the population lived self-sufficiently in villages, with very limited food imports and exports and with no modern means of food preservation or processing.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/slovak/",
            "dishes_count": 10,
            "pictures_count": 10
        },
        {
            "name": "Slovenian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Slovenia",
            "description": "Soups are a relatively recent invention in Slovenian cuisine, but there are over 100. Earlier there were various kinds of porridge, stew and one-pot meals. The most common soups without meat were lean and plain. A typical dish is aleluja, a soup made from turnip peels and a well-known dish during fasting. The most common meat soup is beef soup with noodles, which is often served on Sunday as part of a Sunday lunch (beef soup, fried potatoes, fried steak and lettuce). On feast days and holidays there is often a choice of beef noodle soup or creamy mushroom soup. Pork is popular and common everywhere in Slovenia. Poultry is also often popular. There is a wide variety of meats in different parts of Slovenia. In White Carniola and the Slovenian Littoral mutton and goat are eaten. On St. Martin's Day people feast on roasted goose, duck, turkey, or chicken paired with red cabbage and mlinci. In Lower Carniola and Inner Carniola, they used to eat roasted dormouse and quail. Until the crayfish plague in the 1880s the noble crayfish was a source of income and often on the menu in Lower Carniola and Inner Carniola.\n\nDandelion is popular as a salad ingredient in Slovenia and has been gathered in the fields for centuries. Even today dandelion and potato salad is highly valued. Since it can be picked only for a short time in early spring, much is made of it. Families go on dandelion picking expeditions, and pick enough for a whole week. In the Middle Ages people ate acorns and other forest fruits, particularly in times of famine. Chestnuts were valued, and served as the basis for many outstanding dishes. Walnuts and hazelnuts are used in cakes and desserts. Wild strawberries, loganberries, blackberries, bilberries were a rich source of vitamins. Mushrooms have always been popular, and Slovenians liked picking and eating them. There are many varieties. Honey was used to a considerable extent. Medenjaki, which come in different shapes are honey cakes, which are most commonly heart-shaped and are often used as gifts.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/slovenian/",
            "dishes_count": 22,
            "pictures_count": 22
        },
        {
            "name": "Somali",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Somalia",
            "description": "Somali cuisine varies from region to region and is a fusion of different Somali culinary traditions. It is the product of Somalia's tradition of trade and commerce. Some notable Somali delicacies include Sabaayad/Kimis, Laxooh/Canjeero, xalwo, sambuusa, bariis iskukaris, and Muqmad/Odkac (beef jerky). Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/somali/",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "South African",
            "othernames": "Rainbow",
            "territory": "South Africa",
            "description": "The cuisine of South Africa is sometimes called \"rainbow cuisine\", as it has had a variety of multicultural sources and stages. The cuisine can be generalized as:\n\n- Cookery practiced by indigenous people of Africa such as the Sotho- and Nguni-speaking people.\n\n- Cookery that emerged from several waves of colonization and immigration introduced during the colonial period by white European people of Dutch (since 1652), German, French, Italian, Greek and British (since 1805~1820) descent and their Indo-Asian slaves or servants - this includes the cuisine of the so-called Cape Malay people, which has many characteristics of Indonesia and cooking styles from neighboring colonial cultures such as Portuguese Mozambique.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/south_african/",
            "dishes_count": 20,
            "pictures_count": 33
        }
    ]
}