GET /api/cuisines/?page=6
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{
    "count": 211,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=7",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=5",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Indian-Punjabi",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Punjab, India",
            "description": "Punjabi cuisine is a culinary style originating in the Punjab, a region in the northern part of the Indian subcontinent, which is now divided in an Indian part and a Pakistani part. This cuisine has a rich tradition of many distinct and local ways of cooking. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/indian-punjabi/",
            "dishes_count": 18,
            "pictures_count": 25
        },
        {
            "name": "Indonesian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Indonesia",
            "description": "Indonesian cuisine is one of the most vibrant and colorful cuisines in the world, full of intense flavor. It is diverse, in part because Indonesia is composed of approximately 6,000 populated islands of the total 18,000 in the world's largest archipelago, with more than 300 ethnic groups calling Indonesia their home. Many regional cuisines exist, often based upon indigenous culture and foreign influences. Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important.\r\n\r\nIn 2011, Indonesian cuisine began to gain worldwide recognition, with three of its popular dishes make it to the list of 'World's 50 Most Delicious Foods (Readers' Pick)', a worldwide online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International. Rendang top the list as the number one, followed closely by nasi goreng in number two, and satay in number fourteen.\r\n\r\nIndonesian cuisine varies greatly by region and has many different influences. Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and kari, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence. The cuisines of Eastern Indonesia are similar to Polynesian and Melanesian cuisine. Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as bakmi (noodles), bakso (meat or fish balls), and lumpia (spring rolls) have been completely assimilated.\r\n\r\nAsem = Tamarind\r\nAti = Chicken liver\r\nDaging = Beef\r\nGoreng = Stir-fried\r\nKentang = Potatoes\r\nKerecek = Cattle skin\r\nLabu Siam = Chayote\r\nNasi = Rice\r\nMee = Noodles\r\nSambal = Chili paste\r\nSayur = Vegetable\r\nUdang =  shrimps",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/indonesian/",
            "dishes_count": 80,
            "pictures_count": 89
        },
        {
            "name": "Iranian",
            "othernames": "Persian",
            "territory": "Iran",
            "description": "Iranian food (also referred to as Persian food) is some of the most delicious and fresh in its region. It is also quite healthy, using only small amounts of red meat (usually lamb or beef), emphasizing larger amounts of grains (especially rice), fruits, and vegetables. Although it is often lumped under the category of general \"Middle Eastern\" fare, the Iranian cuisine is able to retain its uniqueness in a variety of ways. One of these ways is preparing meals with contrasting flavors, such as a\n\nRead more: http://www.foodbycountry.com/Germany-to-Japan/Iran.html#ixzz40r0myhOc",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/iranian/",
            "dishes_count": 76,
            "pictures_count": 76
        },
        {
            "name": "Iraqi",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Irac",
            "description": "Iraqi cuisine or Mesopotamian cuisine has a long history going back some 10,000 years – to the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, and ancient Persians. Tablets found in ancient ruins in Iraq show recipes prepared in the temples during religious festivals – the first cookbooks in the world. Ancient Iraq, or Mesopotamia, was home to a sophisticated and highly advanced civilization, in all fields of knowledge, including the culinary arts. However, it was in the Islamic Golden Age when Baghdad was the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate (750–1258) that the Iraqi kitchen reached its zenith. Today, the cuisine of Iraq reflects this rich inheritance as well as strong influences from the culinary traditions of neighbouring Iran (aka Persia), Turkey and the Syria region area. \n\nMeals begin with appetizers and salads – known as Mezza. Some dishes include Kebab (often marinated with garlic, lemon and spices, then grilled), Gauss (grilled meat sandwich wrap, similar to Döner kebab), Bamieh (lamb, okra and tomato stew), Quzi (lamb with rice, almonds, raisins and spices), Falafel (fried chickpea patties served with amba and salad in pita), Kubbah (minced meat ground with bulghur wheat or rice and spices), Masgûf (grilled fish with pepper and tamarind), and Maqluba (a rice, lamb, tomato and aubergine dish). Stuffed vegetable dishes such as Dolma and Mahshi are also popular.\n\nContemporary Iraq reflects the same natural division as ancient Mesopotamia, which consisted of Assyria in the arid northern uplands and Babylonia in the southern alluvial plain. Al-Jazira (the ancient Assyria) grows wheat and crops requiring winter chill such as apples and stone fruits. Al-Irāq (Iraq proper, the ancient Babylonia) grows rice and barley, citrus fruits, and is responsible for Iraq's position as the world's largest producer of dates.\n\n(Wikipedia)",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/iraqi/",
            "dishes_count": 30,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "Irish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ireland",
            "description": "Irish cuisine is a style of cooking originating from Ireland or developed by Irish people. It evolved from centuries of social and political change and mixing between the different cultures on the island, predominantly English and Irish. \n\nThe cuisine takes its influence from the crops grown and animals farmed in its temperate climate. However, the development of Irish cuisine was distorted by the English conquest in the early 17th century because this forced the impoverishment of the mass of the people through land dispossession and the organisation of Irelands economy to provide supplies to England and its armed forces. This also replaced the upper levels of cuisine with English norms. Consequently, the potato, after its widespread adoption in the 18th century became almost the only food of the poor (the vast majority of the population) and, as a result, is often now closely associated with Ireland. Many elements of Irish cuisine were lost during this time and particularly from the Famine up until the late 20th century, but are now being revived. Representative modern Irish dishes include Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, boxty, coddle, and colcannon.\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/irish/",
            "dishes_count": 48,
            "pictures_count": 46
        },
        {
            "name": "Israeli",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Israel",
            "description": "The dish of Israeli cuisine comprises local dishes by people native to Israel and dishes brought to Israel by Jews from the Diaspora. Israeli cuisine has adopted, and continues to adapt, elements of various styles of Jewish cuisine, particularly the Mizrahi, Sephardic and Ashkenazi styles of cooking. It incorporates many foods traditionally eaten in Levantine, Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines, and foods such as falafel, hummus, msabbha, shakshouka, couscous, and za'atar are now widely popular in Israel.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/israeli/",
            "dishes_count": 20,
            "pictures_count": 22
        },
        {
            "name": "Italian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Italy",
            "description": "Italian cuisine has developed through centuries of social and political changes, with roots as far back as antiquity.\n\nSignificant changes occurred with the discovery of the New World and the introduction of potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers and maize, now central to the cuisine but not introduced in quantity until the 18th century. Italian cuisine is noted for its regional diversity, abundance of difference in taste, and it is probably the most popular in the world, with influences abroad.\n\nItalian cuisine is characterized by its simplicity, with many dishes having only four to eight ingredients. Italian cooks rely chiefly on the quality of the ingredients rather than on elaborate preparation. Ingredients and dishes vary by region. Many dishes that were once regional, however, have proliferated with variations throughout the country.\n\nCheese and wine are a major part of the cuisine, with many variations and Denominazione di origine controllata (DOC) (regulated appellation) laws. Coffee, specifically espresso, has become important in Italian cuisine.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/italian/",
            "dishes_count": 184,
            "pictures_count": 220
        },
        {
            "name": "Italian-American",
            "othernames": "Italy-american",
            "territory": "United States",
            "description": "Italian-American cuisine is a style of Italian cuisine adapted throughout the United States of America. Italian-American food has been shaped throughout history by various waves of immigrants and their descendants, called Italian Americans. As immigrants from the different regions of Italy settled throughout the various regions of the United States, many brought with them a distinct regional Italian culinary tradition. Many of these foods and recipes developed into new favorites for the townspeople and later for Americans nationwide.\n\nProminent American chefs and cooks working in the Italian-American tradition include: Giada De Laurentiis, Mario Batali, Michael Chiarello, Frank Pellegrino, Rocco DiSpirito, Tom Colicchio, and Lidia Bastianich.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/italian-american/",
            "dishes_count": 7,
            "pictures_count": 7
        },
        {
            "name": "Ivorian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ivory Coast, Côte D'Ivoire",
            "description": "It is the traditional cuisine of Côte d'Ivoire, or the Ivory Coast, and is based on tubers, grains, pig, chicken, seafood, fish, fresh fruits, vegetables and spices. It is very similar to that of neighbouring countries in West Africa. Common staple foods include grains and tubers. Côte d'Ivoire is one of the largest cocoa producers in the world and also produces palm oil and coffee.\r\n\r\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivorian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/ivorian/",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Jamaican",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Jamaica",
            "description": "Jamaican cuisine includes a mixture of cooking techniques, flavours, spices and influences from the indigenous people on the island of Jamaica, and the Spanish, British, Africans, Indian and Chinese who have inhabited the island. It is also influenced by the crops introduced into the island from tropical Southeast Asia. Jamaican cuisine includes various dishes from the different cultures brought to the island with the arrival of people from elsewhere. Other dishes are novel or a fusion of techniques and traditions. In addition to ingredients that are native to Jamaica, many foods have been introduced and are now grown locally. A wide variety of seafood, tropical fruits and meats are available.\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jamaican_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/jamaican/",
            "dishes_count": 30,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "Japanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Japan",
            "description": "The traditional food of Japan is based on rice with miso soup and other dishes, with an emphasis on seasonal ingredients. The side dishes often consist of fish, pickled vegetables, and vegetables cooked in broth. Fish is common in the traditional cuisine. It is often grilled, but it may also be served raw as sashimi or in sushi. Seafood and vegetables are also deep-fried in a light batter as tempura.\n\nApart from rice, staples include noodles, such as soba and udon. Japan has many simmered dishes such as fish products in broth called oden, or beef in sukiyaki and nikujaga. Foreign food, in particular Chinese food in the form of noodles in soup called ramen and fried dumplings, gyoza, and western food such as curry and hamburger steaks are commonly found in Japan. Historically, the Japanese shunned meat, but with the modernization of Japan in the 1860s, meat-based dishes such as tonkatsu became common.\n\nJapan has an indigenous form of sweets called wagashi, which include ingredients such as red bean paste, as well as its indigenous rice wine sake.\n\nJapanese cuisine, particularly sushi, has now become popular throughout the world. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_cuisine)\n\nDonburi, Don = Rice bowl dish\nKare, kare,  Kari = Curry\nkatsu = deep-fried cutlet of meat\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/japanese/",
            "dishes_count": 185,
            "pictures_count": 211
        },
        {
            "name": "Japanese-Ainu",
            "othernames": "Aynu",
            "territory": "Japan",
            "description": "It is the cuisine of the ethnic Ainu in Japan. The cuisine differs markedly from that of the majority Yamato people of Japan. Raw meat like sashimi, for example, is not served in Ainu cuisine, which instead uses methods such as boiling, roasting and curing to prepare meat. The island of Hokkaidō in northern Japan is where most Ainu live today; however, they once inhabited most of the Kuril islands, the southern half of Sakhalin island, and parts of northern Honshū Island.\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/japanese-ainu/",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Japanese Sushi",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Japan",
            "description": "World class famous Japanese cuisine, introducing Sushi, a name for hundred dishes that contain toppings with vinegar seasoned sushi rice. With it amass variety and distinct flavors, Sushi can be anywhere from raw seafood to vegetarian compatible, mild to spicy, sour, sweet or even bitter. Read on this guide for comprehensive information on types of sushi and what's being popular in the States - https://howdaily.com/sushi/",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/japanese_sushi/",
            "dishes_count": 29,
            "pictures_count": 36
        },
        {
            "name": "Jewish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Jews",
            "description": "Jewish cuisine is a diverse collection of cooking traditions of the Jewish people worldwide. It has evolved over many centuries, shaped by Jewish dietary laws (kashrut), Jewish Festival, and Shabbat (Sabbath) traditions. Jewish cuisine is influenced by the economics, agriculture, and culinary traditions of the many countries where Jewish communities have settled and varies widely throughout the world.\n\nThe distinctive styles in Jewish cuisine are Ashkenazi, Sephardi, Mizrahi, Persian, Yemenite, Indian, and Latin-American. There are also dishes from Jewish communities from Ethiopia to Central Asia.\n\nSince the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, and particularly since the late 1970s, a nascent Israeli \"fusion cuisine\" has developed. Jewish Israeli cuisine has especially adapted a multitude of elements, overlapping techniques and ingredients from many diaspora Jewish culinary traditions.\n\nUsing agricultural products from dishes of one Jewish culinary tradition in the elaboration of dishes of other Jewish culinary traditions, as well as incorporating and adapting various other Middle Eastern dishes from the local non-Jewish population of the Land of Israel (which had not already been introduced via the culinary traditions of Jews which arrived to Israel from the various other Arab countries), Israeli Jewish cuisine is both authentically Jewish (and most often kosher) and distinctively local \"Israeli\", yet thoroughly hybridised from its multicultural diasporas Jewish origins. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/jewish/",
            "dishes_count": 19,
            "pictures_count": 21
        },
        {
            "name": "Jordanian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Jordan",
            "description": "Jordanian cuisine is a traditional style of food preparation originating from, or commonly used in Jordan that has developed from centuries of social and political change.\nThere is wide variety of techniques used in Jordanian cuisine ranging from baking, sautéeing and grilling to stuffing of vegetables (carrots, leaves, eggplants, etc.), meat, and poultry. Also common in Jordanian cuisine is roasting or preparing foods with special sauces.\n\nAs one of the largest producers of olives in the world, olive oil is the main cooking oil in Jordan. Herbs, garlic, onion, tomato sauce and lemon are typical flavours found in Jordan. The blend of spices called za'atar contains a common local herb called Sumac that grows wild in Jordan and ia closely identified with Jordanian and other Mideastern cuisines. Yogurt is commonly served alongside food and is a common ingredient itself, in particular, jameed, a form of dried yogurt is unique to Jordanian cuisine and a main ingredient in Mansaf the national dish of Jordan, and a symbol in Jordanian culture for generosity.\nAnother famous Meat dish in Southern Jordan especially in the Bedouin Desert area of Petra and Wadi Rum is the Zarb[8] which is prepared in a submerged oven also called a \"taboon\". It is considered a delicacy of that area.\n\nInternationally known foods which are common and popular everyday snacks in Jordan include hummus, which is a puree of chick peas blended with tahini, lemon, and garlic and falafel, a deep-fried ball or patty made from ground chickpeas. A typical mezze includes foods such as kibbeh, labaneh, baba ghanoush, tabbouleh, olives and pickles. Bread, rice, freekeh and bulgur all have a role in Jordanian cuisine.\n\nPopular desserts include as baklava, knafeh, halva and qatayef a dish made specially for Ramadan, in addition to seasonal fruits such as watermelons, figs and cactus pear which are served in summer.\n\nTurkish coffee and tea flavored with mint or sage are almost ubiquitous in Jordan. Arabic coffee is also usually served on more formal occasions. Arak, an aniseed flavoured spirit is also drunk with food",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/jordanian/",
            "dishes_count": 15,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "Kazakhs",
            "othernames": "Қазақстан",
            "territory": "Kazakhstan",
            "description": "It is the cuisine of Kazakhstan and traditionally is focused on mutton and horse meat, as well as various milk products. For hundreds of years, Kazakhs were herders who raised fat-tailed sheep, Bactrian camels, and horses, relying on these animals for transportation, clothing, and food. The cooking techniques and major ingredients have been strongly influenced by the nation's nomadic way of life. For example, most cooking techniques are aimed at long-term preservation of food. There is a large practice of salting and drying meat so that it will last, and there is a preference for sour milk, as it is easier to save in a nomadic lifestyle.\n\nMeat in various forms has always been the primary ingredient of Kazakh cuisine, and traditional Kazakh cooking is based on boiling. Horse and mutton are the most popular forms of meat and are most often served in large uncut pieces, which have been boiled. Kazakhs cared especially for horses which they intended to slaughter—keeping them separate from other animals and feeding them so much that they often became so fat they had difficulty moving.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kazakh_cuisine\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/kazakhs/",
            "dishes_count": 6,
            "pictures_count": 6
        },
        {
            "name": "Kenyan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Kenya",
            "description": "There is no singular dish that represents all of Kenya. Different communities have their own native foods. Staples are maize and other cereals depending on the region, including millet and sorghum are eaten with various meats and vegetables. The foods that are universally eaten in Kenya are ugali, sukuma wiki, and nyama choma. Kenya's coastal cuisine is very unique and highly regarded throughout the country.\n\nSukuma wiki, a Swahili phrase which literally means \"to push the week,\" is a simple dish made with greens similar to kale or collards that can also be made with cassava leaves, sweet potato leaves, or pumpkin leaves. Its Swahili name comes from the fact that it is typically eaten to \"get through the week\" or \"stretch the week.\" Nyama Choma is grilled meat – usually goat or sheep. It is grilled over an open fire. It is usually eaten with ugali and kachumbari.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Kenya#Cuisine\n",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/kenyan/",
            "dishes_count": 16,
            "pictures_count": 16
        },
        {
            "name": "Korean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Korea",
            "description": "Korean cuisine has evolved through centuries of social and political change. Originating from ancient agricultural and nomadic traditions in southern Manchuria and the Korean peninsula, Korean cuisine has evolved through a complex interaction of the natural environment and different cultural trends.\r\n\r\nKorean cuisine is largely based upon rice, vegetables, and meats. Traditional Korean meals are noted for the number of side dishes (banchan) that accompany steam-cooked short-grain rice. Kimchi is served often, sometimes at every meal. Commonly used ingredients include sesame oil, doenjang (fermented bean paste), soy sauce, salt, garlic, ginger, pepper flakes and gochujang (fermented red chili paste).\r\n\r\nIngredients and dishes vary by province. Many regional dishes have become national, and dishes that were once regional have proliferated in different variations across the country. The Korean royal court cuisine once brought all of the unique regional specialties together for the royal family. Meals are regulated by Korean cultural etiquette.\r\n\r\nFrom Wikipedia\r\n\r\nnajki = octopus",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/korean/",
            "dishes_count": 149,
            "pictures_count": 161
        },
        {
            "name": "Kosovan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Kosovo",
            "description": "The Kosovan cuisine (Albanian: Kuzhina Kosovare) is a representative of the cuisine of the Balkans and consists of traditional dishes by ethnic groups native to Kosovo. Due to historical and ethnic connections with Albania, it has been significantly influenced by Albanian cuisine and has adopted elements of other Balkan countries.\r\n\r\nBread, dairy, meat, fruits, and vegetables are important staples in Kosovan cuisine. With a diversity of recipes, the Kosovan daily cuisine adjusts well to the country's occasional hot summers and the frequent long winters. As a result of its continental climate, fresh vegetables are consumed in summer while pickles throughout autumn and winter.\r\n\r\nBreakfast in Kosovo is usually light, consisting primarily of a croissant with coffee, sandwiches, scrambled eggs, omelettes, petulla or toast with salami, processed cheese, lettuce and tea. Cereals with milk, waffles, pretzels and homemade pancakes with honey or marmalade are also frequently consumed especially by children.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/kosovan/",
            "dishes_count": 0,
            "pictures_count": 0
        },
        {
            "name": "Kuwaiti",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Kuwait",
            "description": "Kuwaiti cuisine is a fusion of Arabian, Persian, Indian, and Mediterranean cuisines. A prominent dish in Kuwaiti cuisine is machboos, a rice-based specialty usually prepared with basmati rice seasoned with spices, and chicken or mutton (pork is highly restricted due to religious reasons).",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/kuwaiti/",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        }
    ]
}