GET /api/cuisines/?page=5
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{
    "count": 211,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=6",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=4",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Gabonese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Gabon",
            "description": "This cuisine is the cooking traditions, practices, foods and dishes associated with Gabon, a sovereign state on the west coast of Central Africa. French cuisine is prevalent as a notable influence, and in larger cities various French specialities are available. In rural areas, food staples such as cassava, rice and yams are commonly used.]Meats, when available, including chicken and fish, and bush meats such as antelope, wild boar and monkey. Sauces are often used, with hot red pepper berbere paste being a common example. Fruits include bananas, papayas, guavas, mangoes, pineapples, coconuts, avocado and peanuts. Plantains, tomatoes, corn, and eggplant are also used.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/gabonese/",
            "dishes_count": 4,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Georgian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Georgia",
            "description": "Georgian cuisine (Georgian: ქართული სამზარეულო; k’art’uli samzareulo) refers to the cooking styles and dishes that originate in the country of Georgia (along with two breakaway independent states of Abkhazia and South Ossetia) and which are historically prepared by Georgian people around the world. The Georgian cuisine is unique to the country, but also carries some influences from other European and nearby Middle Eastern culinary traditions. Each historical province of Georgia has its own distinct culinary tradition, with variations such as Megrelian, Kakhetian, and Imeretian cuisines. Heavy on meat dishes, the Georgian cuisine also offers a variety of vegetarian dishes.\n\nGeorgian cuisine is the result of the rich interplay of culinary ideas carried along the trade routes by merchants and travelers alike. The importance of both food and drink to Georgian culture is best observed during a feast called supra, when a huge assortment of dishes are prepared, always accompanied by large amounts of wine, and that can last for hours. In a Georgian feast, the role of the tamada (toastmaster) is an important and honoured position.\n\nGeorgian restaurants were prevalent in Russia throughout the 20th century, influenced in part by Joseph Stalin's Georgian ethnicity. In Russia, all major cities have many Georgian restaurants, and Russian restaurants often feature Georgian food items on their menu.\n\nIn countries of the former Soviet Union, Georgian food is also popular due to the immigration of Georgians to other Soviet republics",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/georgian/",
            "dishes_count": 53,
            "pictures_count": 53
        },
        {
            "name": "German",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Germany",
            "description": "German cuisine has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region.\n\nThe southern regions of Germany, including Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia, share many dishes. Austrian cuisine is very similar. This originates in common religious and cultural history. Southern Germany and Austria are mainly Catholic, so religious fasting rules for Friday, Lent and Advent, even if no longer widely practiced, have influenced the cuisine.\n\nGermany has the second-highest number of Michelin starred restaurants, after France https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/german/",
            "dishes_count": 131,
            "pictures_count": 139
        },
        {
            "name": "German-Bavarian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bavaria, Germany",
            "description": "Bavarian cuisine includes many meat and Knödel dishes, and often uses flour. Due to its rural conditions and cold climate, only crops such as beets and potatoes do well in Bavaria, being a staple in the German diet.\n\nThe Bavarian dukes, especially the Wittelsbach family, developed Bavarian cuisine and refined it to be presentable to the royal court. This cuisine has belonged to wealthy households, especially in cities, since the 19th century. The (old) Bavarian cuisine is closely connected to Czech cuisine and Austrian cuisine (especially from Tyrol and Salzburg), mainly through the Wittelsbach and Habsburg families. Already, in the beginning, Bavarians were closely connected to their neighbours in Austria through linguistic, cultural and political similarities, which also reflected on the cuisine.\n\nA characteristic Bavarian cuisine was further developed by both groups, with a distinct similarity to Franconian and Swabian cuisine. A Bavarian speciality is the Brotzeit, a savoury snack, which would originally be eaten between breakfast and lunch.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/german-bavarian/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Ghanaian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ghana",
            "description": "Ghanaian cuisine is the cuisine of the people Ghana. Ghanaian main dishes are organized around a starchy staple food, with which goes a sauce or soup containing a protein source. The main ingredient for the vast majority of soups and stews is tomatoes. Tinned or fresh tomatoes can be used. Nearly all Ghanaian soups and stews are red or orange in appearance as a result.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/ghanaian/",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Greek",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Greece",
            "description": "Greek cuisine is very diverse and although there are many common characteristics among the culinary traditions of different regions within the country, there are also many differences. Greece has an ancient culinary tradition dating back several millennia, and over the centuries Greek cuisine has evolved and absorbed numerous influences and influenced many cuisines itself. Some dishes can be traced back to ancient Greece, some to the Hellenistic and Roman periods, and Byzantium. Many dishes are part of the larger tradition of Ottoman cuisine and their names reveal Arabic, Persian or Turkish roots.\n\nThe most characteristic and ancient element of Greek cuisine is olive oil, which is used in most dishes. Greek cuisine uses some flavorings more often than other Mediterranean cuisines do, namely: oregano, mint, garlic, onion, dill and bay laurel leaves. Other common herbs and spices include basil, thyme and fennel seed. Parsley is also used as a garnish on some dishes.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/greek/",
            "dishes_count": 90,
            "pictures_count": 110
        },
        {
            "name": "Greenlandic",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Greenland",
            "description": "It is traditionally based on meat from marine mammals, game, birds, and fish, and normally contains high levels of protein. Since colonization and the arrival of international trade, the cuisine has been increasingly influenced by Danish and Canadian cuisine.\n\nThe national dish of Greenland is suaasat, a traditional Greenlandic soup. It is often made from seal, or from whale, reindeer, or seabirds. The soup often includes onions and potatoes and is simply seasoned with salt and pepper, or bay leaf. The soup is often thickened with rice, or by soaking barley in the water overnight so that the starches leach into the water.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/greenlandic/",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Grenadian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Grenada",
            "description": "The national dish, oil down, is a combination of breadfruit, coconut milk, turmeric (misnamed saffron), dumplings, callaloo (taro leaves), and salted meat such as saltfish (cod), smoked herring or salt beef. It is often cooked in a large pot commonly referred to by locals as a karhee, or curry pot. Popular street foods include aloo pie, doubles, and dal puri served wrapped around a curry, commonly goat, and bakes and fish cakes. Sweets include kurma, guava cheese, fudge or barfi, tamarind balls, rum, raisin ice cream, currant rolls, and Grenadian spice cake.\r\n\r\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Culture_of_Grenada#Cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/grenadian/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Guatemalan",
            "othernames": "Maya",
            "territory": "Guatemala",
            "description": "Many traditional foods in Guatemalan cuisine are based on Maya cuisine and prominently feature corn, chilies and beans as key ingredients.\n\nThere are also foods that are commonly eaten on certain days of the week. For example, it is a popular custom to eat paches (a kind of tamale made from potatoes) on Thursday. Certain dishes are also associated with special occasions, such as fiambre for All Saints Day on November 1 and tamales, which are common around Christmas.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/guatemalan/",
            "dishes_count": 51,
            "pictures_count": 50
        },
        {
            "name": "Guernsey",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Guernsey",
            "description": "Islanders are passionate about their food and it's not hard to see why - rich in natural ingredients from both the sea and land, Guernsey, and its food, has a unique flavour. Dishes traditional in Guernsey cuisine are the Guernsey gâche, a rich fruit bread, gâche mêlaïe, apple pudding, bean jar, a type of cassoulet of pork and beans, and conger soup.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/guernsey/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Guyanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Guyana",
            "description": "This cuisine is similar to the rest of the Anglo Caribbean, especially Trinidad, where the ethnic mix is somewhat similar. Dishes have been adapted to Guyanese tastes, often by the addition of herbs and spices. Unique preparations include Guyana Pepperpot, a stew of Amerindian origin made with meat, cassareep (a bitter extract of the cassava), and seasonings. Other favourites are cassava bread, stews, and Metemgee, a thick rich type of soup with a ground provision, coconut milk and large dumplings (called Duff), eaten with fried fish or chicken. Homemade bread-making, an art in many villages, is a reflection of the British influence that includes pastries such as cheese rolls, pine (pineapple) tarts, and patties. Curry is widely popular in Guyana and most types of meat can be carried: chicken, seafood, goat, lamb, and even duck. Guyanese-style Chow Mein is another dish cooked regularly in many homes.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/guyanese/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Haitian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Haiti",
            "description": "Haitian cuisine consists of cooking traditions and practices from Haiti. While the cuisine is unpretentious and simple, the flavours are of a bold and spicy nature that demonstrate a primary influence of African culinary aesthetic, paired with a very French sophistication with notable derivatives coming from native Taíno and Spanish techniques.\nHaitian cuisine is often lumped together with other regional islands as \"Caribbean cuisine,\" however it maintains an independently unique flavor. It involves the extensive use of herbs, and the liberal use of peppers. A typical dish would probably be a plate of riz collé aux pois (diri kole ak pwa), which is rice with red kidney beans (pinto beans are often used as well) glazed with a marinade as a sauce and topped off with red snapper, tomatoes and onions. It is often called the Riz National, considered to be the national rice of Haiti. The dish can be accompanied by bouillon. Bouillon is a hearty soup consisting of various spices, potatoes, tomatoes, and meats such as goat or beef. Dishes vary by region.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/haitian/",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Hawaiian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Hawaii",
            "description": "The cuisine of Hawaii incorporates five distinct styles of food reflecting the diverse food history of settlement and immigration in the Hawaiian Islands. In the pre-contact period of Ancient Hawaii (300 AD–1778), Polynesian voyagers brought plants and animals to the Islands. As Native Hawaiians settled the area, they fished, raised taro for poi, planted coconuts, sugarcane, sweet potatoes and yams, and cooked meat and fish in earth ovens. After first contact in 1778, European and American cuisine arrived along with missionaries and whalers, who introduced their own foods and built large sugarcane plantations. Christian missionaries brought New England cuisine while whalers introduced salted fish which eventually transformed into the side dish lomilomi salmon.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/hawaiian/",
            "dishes_count": 15,
            "pictures_count": 16
        },
        {
            "name": "Honduran",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Honduras",
            "description": "Honduran cuisine is a fusion of indigenous (Lenca) cuisine, Spanish cuisine, Caribbean cuisine and African cuisine. There are also dishes from the Garifuna people. Coconut and coconut milk are featured in both sweet and savory dishes. Regional specialties include fried fish, tamales, carne asada and baleadas. Other popular dishes include: meat roasted with chismol and carne asada, chicken with rice and corn, and fried fish with pickled onions and jalapeños. In the coastal areas and in the Bay Islands, seafood and some meats are prepared in many ways, some of which include coconut milk.\n\nAmong the soups the Hondurans enjoy are bean soup, mondongo soup (tripe soup), seafood soups and beef soups. Generally all of these soups are mixed with plantains, yuca, and cabbage, and served with corn tortillas.\n\nOther typical dishes are the montucas or corn tamale, stuffed tortillas, and tamales wrapped in plantain leaves. Also part of Honduran typical dishes is an abundant selection of tropical fruits such as papaya, pineapple, plum, sapote, passion fruit and bananas which are prepared in many ways while they are still green.\n\nSoft drinks are often drunk with dinner or lunch.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honduran_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/honduran/",
            "dishes_count": 8,
            "pictures_count": 8
        },
        {
            "name": "Hong Kong",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Hong Kong",
            "description": "Hong Kong cuisine is mainly influenced by Cantonese cuisine, non-Cantonese Chinese cuisine (especially Teochew, and Hakka, Hokkien and the Jiangsu & Zhejiang), the Western world, Japan, and Southeast Asia, due to Hong Kong's past as a British colony and long history of being an international city of commerce. From the roadside stalls to the most upscale restaurants, Hong Kong provides an unlimited variety of food in every class. Complex combinations and international gourmet expertise have given Hong Kong the reputable labels of \"Gourmet Paradise\" and \"World's Fair of Food\"",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/hong_kong/",
            "dishes_count": 18,
            "pictures_count": 18
        },
        {
            "name": "Hungarian",
            "othernames": "Magyar",
            "territory": "Hungary",
            "description": "The cuisine characteristic of the nation of Hungary and its primary ethnic group, the Magyars. Traditional Hungarian dishes are primarily based on meats, seasonal vegetables, fruits, fresh bread, dairy products and cheeses.\n\nHungarians are especially passionate about their meat stews, casseroles, steaks, roasted pork, beef, poultry, lamb and game. The mixing of different varieties of meats is a traditional feature of Hungarian cuisine. Goulash, stuffed peppers, cabbage rolls, and Fatányéros (Hungarian mixed grill on a wooden platter) are all dishes that can combine beef and pork, and sometimes mutton. Goulash is a stew with more gravy or a soup using meat with bones, paprika, caraway, vegetables (typically carrots and parsley root) and potatoes or various tiny dumplings or pasta simmered with the meat. Other famous Hungarian meat stews include paprikás, a paprika stew with meat simmered in thick creamy paprika gravy, and pörkölt, a Hungarian stew with boneless meat (usually beef or pork), onion, and sweet paprika powder, both served with nokedli (small dumplings). In old fashioned dishes, fruits such as plums and apricots are cooked with meat or in piquant sauces/stuffings for game, roasts and other cuts. Various kinds of noodles and dumplings, potatoes, and rice are commonly served as a side dish. Hungarian sausages (kolbász) and winter salami are a major part of Hungarian cuisine.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/hungarian/",
            "dishes_count": 25,
            "pictures_count": 27
        },
        {
            "name": "Icelandic",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Iceland",
            "description": "The cuisine of Iceland has a long history. Important parts of Icelandic cuisine are lamb, dairy, and fish, the latter due to Iceland's being surrounded by ocean. Popular foods in Iceland include skyr, hangikjöt (smoked lamb), kleinur, laufabrauð and bollur. Þorramatur is a traditional buffet served at midwinter festivals called Þorrablót; it includes a selection of traditionally cured meat and fish products served with rúgbrauð (dense dark and sweet rye bread) and brennivín (an Icelandic akvavit). The flavours of this traditional country food originate in its preservation methods; pickling in fermented whey or brine, drying and smoking.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/icelandic/",
            "dishes_count": 16,
            "pictures_count": 16
        },
        {
            "name": "I-kiribati",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Kiribati",
            "description": "The most important dish in Kiribati is rice which is generally served with most meals. A very simple dish is that prepared with fish of different sizes from the sea. Food in Kiribati also consists of fish and seafood, such as fresh shellfish, crabs, and shrimps. Except these tasty dishes, people from Kiribati use all sorts of sauces and spices. Seafood is very tasty if it is left uncooked in a vinaigrette matrix, grilled, and even stuffed with onions wrapped in banana leaves. In Kiribati exotic dishes are based on coconut and coconut milk that are great in cooking meat and vegetable dishes. More than this, coconuts are used in creating mouth-watering desserts like macapuno or thick dessert jam, bibingka or pudding made of rice, coconut milk, Sugar and eggs.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/i-kiribati/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Indian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "India",
            "description": "Indian cuisine encompasses a wide variety of regional cuisines native to india. given the range of diversity in soil type, climate and occupations, these cuisines vary significantly from each other and use locally available spices, herbs, vegetables and fruits. indian food is also heavily influenced by religious and cultural choices and traditions.\r\n\r\nthe development of these cuisines have been shaped by dharmic beliefs, and in particular by vegetarianism, which is a growing dietary trend in indian society. there has also been central asian influence on north indian cuisine from the years of mughal rule. indian cuisine has been and is still evolving, as a result of the nation's cultural interactions with other societies.\r\n\r\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/indian_cuisine\r\n\r\nAloo = Potato\r\nAṇḍā,अंडा = Egg\r\nChana = chickpeas\r\nDal = Lentil\r\nḌēyarī, डेयरी = Dairy\r\nGobi = cauliflower\r\nGosht = Meat\r\nHanī, हनी = Honey\r\nJal = water\r\nJeera = cumin\r\nkeema, qeema = Minced meat\r\nMasala = Mixture of spices ground into a paste or powder\r\nManasā = Meat, मनसा\r\nMattar-Rudhrapur = Green Peas\r\nPalak =  Spinach\r\nPaneer, Panīra, पनीर = Paneer cheese, fresh cheese\r\nPōlṭrī, पोल्ट्री = Poultry\r\nRajma = red kidney beans\r\nSaag = Spinach\r\nSamudrī bhōjana = Seafood, समुद्री भोजन\r\nTikki = cutlet or croquette\r\nUrad = black lentil",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/indian/",
            "dishes_count": 460,
            "pictures_count": 534
        },
        {
            "name": "Indian-Chinese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "India, China",
            "description": "Adaptation of Chinese seasoning and cooking techniques to Indian tastes through a larger offering of vegetarian dishes. The Indian Chinese cuisine is said to have been developed by the small Chinese community that has lived in Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) for over a century. Today, Chinese food is an integral part of the Indian culinary scene. It is also enjoyed by Indian and Chinese communities in Malaysia, Singapore and North America. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Chinese_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/indian-chinese/",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 19
        }
    ]
}