GET /api/cuisines/?page=4
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{
    "count": 211,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=5",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=3",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Cypriot",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cyprus",
            "description": "Cuisine of Cyprus and is closely related to Greek and Turkish cuisine; it has also been influenced by Byzantine, French, Italian, Catalan, Ottoman and Middle Eastern cuisines.\n\nFrequently used ingredients are fresh vegetables such as zucchini, green peppers, okra, green beans, artichokes, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and grape leaves, and pulses such as beans (for fasolia), broad beans, peas, black-eyed beans, chick-peas and lentils. Pears, apples, grapes, oranges, Mandarin oranges, nectarines, mespila, blackberries, cherries, strawberries, figs, watermelon, melon, avocado, citrus, lemon, pistachio, almond, chestnut, walnut, hazelnut are some of the commonest of the fruits and nuts.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/cypriot/",
            "dishes_count": 19,
            "pictures_count": 19
        },
        {
            "name": "Czech",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Czech Republic, Czechia",
            "description": "Czech cuisine has both influenced and been influenced by the cuisines of surrounding countries. Many of the cakes and pastries that are popular in Central Europe originated within the Czech lands. Contemporary Czech cuisine is more meat-based than in previous periods; the current abundance of farmable meat has enriched its presence in regional cuisine. Traditionally, meat has been reserved for once-weekly consumption, typically on weekends. The body of Czech meals typically consists of two or more courses; the first course is traditionally soup, the second course is the main dish, and the third course can include supplementary courses, such as dessert or compote (kompot). In Czech cuisine, thick soups and many kinds of sauces, both based on stewed or cooked vegetables and meats, often with cream, as well as baked meats with natural sauces (gravies), are popular dishes.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/czech/",
            "dishes_count": 28,
            "pictures_count": 30
        },
        {
            "name": "Danish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Denmark",
            "description": "Danish food culture and culinary heritage - has been cultivated and improved for many generations - and is mainly rooted from the old country kitchen - with ancient food recipes from all over the Danish kingdom - created first and foremost - as a shield to protect the Danes against the cold weather conditions in Denmark. That’s why the Danes for centuries have eaten a lot of meat - especially loads of pork - but also beef together with plenty of potatoes and vegetables. Poultry and fish products are the Danes second choice. The cold and often wet climate in Denmark requires a lot of food with high nutritional values that contain many vitamins - minerals and proteins to mobilise a great portion of energy - which is a vital source - needed for work - at school - for sports and another form of daily activities - when living in a dynamic and modern society like Denmark that demands plenty of individual energy and human recourses every day.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/danish/",
            "dishes_count": 17,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "Djiboutian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Djibouti",
            "description": "It is consists of a mixture of Somali, Afar, Yemeni, and French cuisine, with some additional South Asian (especially Indian) culinary influences. Meals are typically halal. Several popular dishes feature seafood and meat, including Fah-fah (spicy boiled beef soup).\n\nThe main dish is typically a pancake-like bread called lahoh, which might also be eaten with a stew or soup, such as wat. A side dish of liver (usually beef), goat meat (hilib ari), diced beef cooked in a bed of soup (suqaar), or jerky (oodkac or muqmad), may also be served. Three pieces of lahoh are often eaten along with honey, ghee, and a cup of tea.\n\nLunch (qado) and dinner (casho) are often served with an elaborate main dish of stew (maraq), which comes in a variety of styles and flavors. Rice (bariis) is often served with meat and/or a banana on the side. In Djibouti City, steak and fish are widely consumed. Pasta (baasto) is frequently presented with a heavier stew than the Italian pasta sauce, but is otherwise served in a similar manner as the rice. Grilled meats are frequently eaten with the pasta.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/djiboutian/",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Dominican",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Dominican Republic",
            "description": " cuisine is predominantly made up of a combination of Spanish, indigenous Taíno, and African influences. Many Middle-Eastern dishes have been adopted into Dominican cuisine, such as the \"Quipe\" that comes from the Lebanese kibbeh. Dominican cuisine resembles that of other countries in Latin America, those of the nearby islands of Puerto Rico and Cuba, most of all, though the dish names differ sometimes.\n\nA traditional breakfast would consist of mangú, sauteed onions, fried eggs, fried salami, fried cheese and sometimes avocado. This is called \"Los Tres Golpes\" or \"The Three Hits\". As in Spain, the largest, most important meal of the day is lunch. Its most typical form, nicknamed La Bandera (\"The Flag\"), consists of rice, red beans and meat (beef, chicken, pork, or fish), sometimes accompanied by a side of salad.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominican_Republic_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/dominican/",
            "dishes_count": 34,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "Dominica's",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Dominica",
            "description": "Not to be confused with the Dominican Republic.\r\n\r\nDominica's cuisine is similar to that of other Caribbean islands, particularly Jamaica, Saint Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago. Like other Commonwealth Caribbean islands, Dominicans have developed a distinct twist to their cuisine. Breakfast is an important daily meal, typically including saltfish, dried and salted codfish, and \"bakes\" (fried dough). Saltfish and bakes are combined for a fast-food snack that can be eaten throughout the day; vendors on Dominica's streets sell these snacks to passersby, together with fried chicken, fish and fruit, and yogurt \"smoothies\". Other breakfast meals include cornmeal porridge, which is made with fine cornmeal or polenta, milk or condensed milk, and sugar to sweeten. Traditional British-influenced dishes, such as eggs and toast, are also popular, as are fried fish and plantains.\r\n\r\nCommon vegetables include plantains, tannias (a root vegetable), sweet potatoes, potatoes, rice, and peas. Meat and poultry typically eaten include chicken, beef and fish. These are often prepared in stews with onions, carrots, garlic, ginger, and herbs. The vegetables and meat are browned to create a rich dark sauce. Popular meals include rice and peas, brown stew chicken, stew beef, fried and stewed fish, and many different types of hearty fish broths and soups. These are filled with dumplings, carrots, and ground provisions.\r\n\r\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominica#Cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/dominicas/",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Dutch",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Netherlands",
            "description": "Dutch cuisine is traditionally quite simple, dominated by the Netherlands strong agricultural industries. Traditionally, Dutch cuisine is simple and straightforward, with many vegetables and little meat; breakfast and lunch are typically bread with toppings like cheese while dinner is meat and potatoes, supplemented with seasonal vegetables.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/dutch/",
            "dishes_count": 30,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "-Eastern European-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Europe, Czech , Hungary, Polish, Russia, Ukrain",
            "description": "Eastern European cuisine is a generic term for the rich tapestry of ethnic cuisines that encompasses many different cultures, ethnicities, languages, and histories of East-Central and Eastern European nations excluding most Balkan countries.\n\nThe cuisine of the region is strongly influenced by its climate and still varies, depending on a country. For example, Belarusian, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian cuisine show many similarities",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/-eastern_european-/",
            "dishes_count": 23,
            "pictures_count": 24
        },
        {
            "name": "East Timorese",
            "othernames": "Timor-leste",
            "territory": "East Timor",
            "description": "The Cuisine of East Timor consists of regional popular foods such as pork, fish, basil, tamarind, legumes, corn, rice, root vegetables, and tropical fruit. East Timorese cuisine has influences from Southeast Asian foods and from Portuguese dishes from its colonisation by Portugal. Flavours and ingredients from other former Portuguese colonies can be found due to the presence of Portuguese soldiers from other colonies in East Timor.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/east_timorese/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Ecuadorian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ecuador",
            "description": "Ecuadorian cuisine is diverse, varying with altitude, and associated agricultural conditions. Pork, chicken, beef, and cuy (guinea pig) are popular in the mountainous regions, and are served with a variety of carbohydrate-rich foods, especially rice, corn, and potatoes. A popular street food in mountainous regions is hornado, consisting of potatoes served with roasted pig. Some examples of Ecuadorian cuisine in general include patacones (unripe plantains fried in oil, mashed up, and then refried), llapingachos (a pan seared potato ball), and seco de chivo (a type of stew made from goat). A wide variety of fresh fruit is available, particularly at lower altitudes, including granadilla, passionfruit, naranjilla, several types of bananas, uvilla, taxo, and tree tomato.\n\nThe food is somewhat different in the southern mountainous areas, featuring typical Loja food such as repe, a soup prepared with green bananas; cecina, roasted pork; and miel con quesillo or \"cuajada\", as dessert. In the rainforest, a dietary staple is the yuca, elsewhere called cassava. The starchy root is peeled and boiled, fried, or used in a variety of other dishes. It's also used as a bread, and has spread throughout the nation, most notably, to Quito where a company sells the native pan de yuca in a new sense; different types sold with frozen yogurt. Many fruits are available in this region, including bananas, tree grapes, and peach palms. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecuadorian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/ecuadorian/",
            "dishes_count": 35,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "Egyptian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Egypt",
            "description": "Cuisine from Egypt makes heavy use of legumes, vegetables and fruits since Egypt's rich Nile valley and delta produce large quantities of these crops in high quality.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/egyptian/",
            "dishes_count": 34,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "English",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "England",
            "description": "British food has traditionally been based on beef, lamb, pork, chicken and fish and generally served with potatoes and one other vegetable. The most common and typical foods eaten in Britain include the sandwich, fish and chips, pies like the cornish pasty, trifle and roasts dinners.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/english/",
            "dishes_count": 97,
            "pictures_count": 102
        },
        {
            "name": "Eritrean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Eritrea",
            "description": "The Eritrean cuisines shares similarities with the northern half of Ethiopian but with a subtle difference in the foods, given the history of the two countries.\n\nThe main traditional food in Eritrean cuisine is tsebhi (stew), served with taita (flatbread made from teff, wheat, or sorghum), and hilbet (paste made from legumes; mainly lentil and faba beans). A typical traditional Eritrean dish consists of injera accompanied by a spicy stew, which frequently includes beef, goat, lamb or fish. Overall, Eritrean cuisine strongly resembles that of neighboring Ethiopia, although Eritrean cooking tends to feature more seafood than Ethiopian cuisine on account of its coastal location. Eritrean dishes are also frequently lighter in texture than Ethiopian meals as they tend to employ less seasoned butter and spices and more tomatoes, as in the tsebhi dorho delicacy.\n\nAdditionally, owing to its colonial history, cuisine in Eritrea features more Ottoman and Italian influences than are present in Ethiopian cooking, including more pasta specials and greater use of curry powders and cumin. People in Eritrea likewise tend to drink coffee, whereas sweetened tea is preferred in Somalia. Christian Eritreans also drink sowa (a bitter fermented barley) and mies (a fermented honey beverage), while Muslim Eritreans abstain from drinking alcohol.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/eritrean/",
            "dishes_count": 6,
            "pictures_count": 6
        },
        {
            "name": "Estonian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Estonia",
            "description": "Traditional Estonian cuisine has substantially been based on meat and potatoes, and on fish in coastal and lakeside areas, but now bears influence from many other cuisines, including a variety of international foods and dishes, with a number of contributions from the traditions of nearby countries. Scandinavian, German, Russian, Latvian, Lithuanian and other influences have played their part. The most typical foods in Estonia have been rye bread, pork, potatoes and dairy products. Estonian eating habits have historically been closely linked to the seasons. In terms of staples, Estonia belongs firmly to the beer, vodka, rye bread and pork \"belt\" of Europe. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Estonian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/estonian/",
            "dishes_count": 11,
            "pictures_count": 11
        },
        {
            "name": "Ethiopian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ethiopia",
            "description": "Ethiopian cuisine characteristically consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes. This is usually in the form of wat (also w'et or wot), a thick stew, served atop injera, a large sourdough flatbread, which is about 50 centimeters (20 inches) in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour. Ethiopians eat exclusively with their right hands, using pieces of injera to pick up bites of entrées and side dishes. Utensils are optional.\n\nThe Ethiopian Orthodox Church prescribes a number of fasting (tsom, Ge'ez: ጾም ṣōm) periods, including Wednesdays, Fridays, and the entire Lenten season, so Ethiopian cuisine contains many dishes that are vegan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopian_cuisine\n\nBe Siga, Besiga = Meat\nDoro = chicken\nGomen = Collard Greens\nIngudai = mushroom\nTibs = saute\nwat = stew",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/ethiopian/",
            "dishes_count": 38,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "European",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Europe",
            "description": "European cuisine, or alternatively Western cuisine, is a generalized term collectively referring to the cuisines of Europe and other Western countries, including (depending on the definition) that of Russia, as well as non-indigenous cuisines of Australasia, the Americas, Southern Africa, and Oceania, which derive substantial influence from European settlers in those regions. The term is used by East Asians to contrast with Asian styles of cooking.[3] (This is analogous to Westerners' referring collectively to the cuisines of East Asian countries as Asian cuisine.) When used by Westerners, the term may sometimes refer more specifically to cuisine in Europe; in this context, a synonym is Continental cuisine, especially in British English.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/european/",
            "dishes_count": 66,
            "pictures_count": 65
        },
        {
            "name": "Fijian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Fiji",
            "description": "Traditional Fijian food is a wonderful amalgam of fresh, local ingredients found in the tropics and the traditional preparations and cooking methods passed down the generations. Coconut, fish, rice, taro, sweet potatoes, cassava and breadfruit are the main components in local Fijian dishes.\n\nLovo is a Fijian delicacy prepared for communal events such as weddings and festivals. A makeshift underground oven is fashioned by digging a hole into the ground and lining it with coconut husks, which are then lit on fire and covered by stones. Meats, fish and vegetables wrapped in banana leaves are then placed on top of the heated stones and cooked for about two and a half hours. Most large resorts in Fiji have a lovo night once a week.\n\nAnother national delicacy is kokodo, raw mahi-mahi (a type of fish) marinated in coconut cream, lime, onions and tomatoes. Coconut cream is an important ingredient in two other Fijian delicacies: Rourou, a dish made of taro leaves, and tavioka, a baked dish made of tapioca and mashed bananas. Duruka, an unusual asparagus-like vegetable that is seasonal during the months of April and May, is also a popular traditional Fijian dish. The national drink of Fiji is kava, which was traditionally prepared by virgins, who chewed the root of the pepper plant before mixing it with water, but is now made in a more hygienic fashion: by pounding the root in a wooden bowl.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/fijian/",
            "dishes_count": 10,
            "pictures_count": 10
        },
        {
            "name": "Filipino",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "The Philippines",
            "description": "Philippine cuisine consists of the food, preparation methods and eating customs found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the food associated with it have evolved over many centuries from its Austronesian origins to a mixed cuisine of Malay, Spanish, Chinese, and American, as well as other Asian and Latin influences adapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate.\r\n\r\nDishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to the elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas of Spanish origin, and spaghetti and lasagna of Italian origin. Popular dishes include: lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomato sauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), puchero (beef in bananas and tomato sauce), afritada (chicken and/or pork simmered in a peanut sauce with vegetables), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), pinakbet (kabocha squash, eggplant, beans, okra, and tomato stew flavored with shrimp paste), crispy pata (deep-fried pig's leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).\r\n-Wikipedia-\r\n\r\nmerienda = breakfast, lunch, snack and \r\nmerienda cena = Dinner\r\nItlog = eggs\r\nPancit, pansit = noodles",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/filipino/",
            "dishes_count": 155,
            "pictures_count": 169
        },
        {
            "name": "Finnish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Finland",
            "description": "Cuisine from Finland is notable for generally combining traditional country fare and haute cuisine with contemporary continental style cooking. Fish and meat (usually pork, beef or reindeer) play a prominent role in traditional Finnish dishes in some parts of the country, while the dishes in others have traditionally included various vegetables and mushrooms. Refugees from Karelia contributed to foods in other parts of Finland.\n\nFinnish foods often use wholemeal products (rye, barley, oats) and berries (such as blueberries, lingonberries, cloudberries, and sea buckthorn). Milk and its derivatives like buttermilk are commonly used as food, drink or in various recipes. Various turnips were common in traditional cooking, but were replaced with the potato after its introduction in the 18th century.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/finnish/",
            "dishes_count": 52,
            "pictures_count": 52
        },
        {
            "name": "French",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "France",
            "description": "French cuisine (French: cuisine française, IPA: [k?i.zin f??~.s?z]) consists of cooking traditions and practices from France, famous for rich tastes and subtle nuances with a long and rich history. France, a country famous for its agriculture and independently minded peasants, was long a creative powerbase for delicious recipes, that are both healthy and refined. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/french/",
            "dishes_count": 177,
            "pictures_count": 191
        }
    ]
}