GET /api/cuisines/?page=2
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{
    "count": 206,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=3",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Basque",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Basque Country",
            "description": "It is refers to the cuisine of the Basque Country and includes meats and fish grilled over hot coals, marmitako and lamb stews, cod, Tolosa bean dishes, paprikas from Lekeitio, pintxos (Basque tapas), Idiazabal sheep's cheese, txakoli sparkling wine, and Basque cider. A basquaise is a type of dish prepared in the style of Basque cuisine that often includes tomatoes and sweet or hot red peppers.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/basque/",
            "dishes_count": 8,
            "pictures_count": 8
        },
        {
            "name": "Belarusian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Belarus",
            "description": "The cuisine from Belarus shares the same roots with cuisines of other Eastern and Northern European countries, basing predominantly on meat and various vegetables typical for the region.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/belarusian/",
            "dishes_count": 24,
            "pictures_count": 21
        },
        {
            "name": "Belgian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Belgium",
            "description": "Belgian cuisine is widely varied with significant regional variations while also reflecting the cuisines of neighbouring France, Germany and the Netherlands. It is sometimes said that Belgian food is served in the quantity of German cuisine but with the quality of French food. Outside the country, Belgium is best known for its chocolate, waffles, fries and beer.\n\nThough Belgium has many distinctive national dishes, many internationally popular foods like hamburgers and spaghetti bolognese are also popular in Belgium, and most of what Belgians eat is also eaten in neighbouring countries. 'Belgian cuisine' therefore usually refers to dishes of Belgian origin, or those considered typically Belgian.\n\nBelgian cuisine traditionally prizes regional and seasonal ingredients. Ingredients typical in Belgian dishes include potatoes, leeks, grey shrimp, white asparagus, Belgian endives and local beer, in addition to common European staples including meat, cheese and butter. Belgians typically eat three meals a day, with a light breakfast, medium or large-sized lunch and small dinner.\n\nBelgium has a plethora of dishes and products that are local to a specific area. Examples include waterzooi from Ghent, the couque biscuit from the town of Dinant, and tarte au riz from Verviers. While their local origins are acknowledged, most such dishes are enjoyed throughout Belgium.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/belgian/",
            "dishes_count": 40,
            "pictures_count": 44
        },
        {
            "name": "Belizean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Belize",
            "description": "Belizean cuisine is an amalgamation of all ethnicities in the nation of Belize and their respectively wide variety of foods. Breakfast consists of bread, flour tortillas, or fry jacks that are often homemade. Fry jacks are eaten with various cheeses, refried beans, various forms of eggs or cereal, along with milk, coffee, or tea.\n\nMidday meals vary, from lighter foods such as rice and beans, tamales, panades (fried meat pies), escabeche (onion soup), chimole (soup), stew chicken and garnaches (fried tortillas with beans, cheese, and sauce) to various constituted dinners featuring some type of rice and beans, meat and salad or coleslaw.\n\nIn the rural areas meals may be more simplified than in the cities. The Maya use recado, corn or maize for most of their meals, and the Garifuna are fond of seafood, cassava (particularly made into cassava bread or Ereba) and vegetables. Belize abounds with restaurants and fast food establishments selling fairly cheaply. Local fruits are quite common, but raw vegetables from the markets less so. Mealtime is a communion for families and schools and some businesses close at midday for lunch, reopening later in the afternoon.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/belizean/",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "Beninese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Benin",
            "description": "Beninese cuisine is known in Africa for its exotic ingredients and flavorful dishes. Beninese cuisine involves lots of fresh meals served with a variety of sauces. Meat is usually quite expensive, and meals are generally light on meat and generous on vegetable fat.\n\nIn southern Benin cuisine, the most common ingredient is corn, often used to prepare dough which is mainly served with peanut- or tomato-based sauces. Fish and chicken are the most common meats used in southern Beninese cuisine, but beef, pork, goat and bush rat are also consumed. Meats are often fried in palm or peanut oil. Rice, beans, tomatoes and couscous are also significant staple foods. Fruits are common in this region, including mandarin oranges, oranges, bananas, kiwi, avocados, pineapples and peanuts.\n\nYams are the main staple in the northern Benin, and are also often served with peanut- or tomato-based sauces. The population in the northern provinces uses beef and pork meat which is also fried in palm or peanut oil or cooked in sauces. Cheese is also frequently used in some dishes. Couscous, rice and beans are also commonly eaten, along with fruits such as mangos, oranges, and avocados.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/beninese/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Bermudian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bermuda",
            "description": "Bermudian cuisine is the cuisine of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. The cuisine of the islands reflects a rich and diverse history and heritage blending English cuisine and Portuguese cuisine with preparations of local seafood species, particularly wahoo and rockfish. Traditional dishes include codfish and potatoes served either with an add on of hard boiled egg and butter or olive oil sauce with a banana or in the Portuguese style with tomato-onion sauce, peas and rice. Hoppin' John, pawpaw casserole and fish chowder are also a specialties of Bermuda. As most ingredients used in Bermuda’s cuisine are imported, local dishes are offered with a global blend, with fish as the major ingredient, in any food eaten at any time.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/bermudian/",
            "dishes_count": 4,
            "pictures_count": 4
        },
        {
            "name": "Bhutanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bhutan",
            "description": "Bhutanese cuisine (Dzongkha: འབྲུག་ཟས་; Wylie: brug-zas) employs a lot of red rice (like brown rice in texture, but with a nutty taste, the only variety of rice that grows at high altitudes), buckwheat, and increasingly maize. Buckwheat is eaten mainly in Bumthang, maize in the Eastern districts, and rice elsewhere. The diet in the hills also includes chicken, yak meat, dried beef, pork, pork fat, and lamb. Soups and stews of meat, rice, ferns, lentils, and dried vegetables, spiced with chili peppers and cheese, are a favorite meal during the cold seasons. Zow shungo is a rice dish mixed with leftover vegetables. Ema datshi is a spicy dish made with large, green chili peppers in a cheesy sauce (similar to chili con queso), which might be called the national dish for its ubiquity and the pride that Bhutanese have for it.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/bhutanese/",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 20
        },
        {
            "name": "Bolivian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bolivia",
            "description": "Bolivian cuisine is very varied and stems from the combination of Spanish cuisine with Indigenous ingredients and Aymara traditions among others, with later influences from Argentinians, Germans, Italians, Basques, Russians, Poles, and Arabs due to the arrival of immigrants from those countries. The three traditional staples of Bolivian cuisine are corn, potatoes, and beans. These ingredients have been combined with a number of staples brought by the Spanish, such as rice, wheat, and meat, including beef, pork, and chicken.\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolivian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/bolivian/",
            "dishes_count": 40,
            "pictures_count": 57
        },
        {
            "name": "Bosnian And Herzegovina",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bosnia And Herzegovina",
            "description": "Bosnian cuisine uses many spices, but usually in moderate quantities. Most dishes are light, as they are cooked in lots of water; the sauces are fully natural, consisting of little more than the natural juices of the vegetables in the dish. Typical ingredients include tomatoes, potatoes, onions, garlic, bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots, cabbage, mushrooms, spinach, courgette, dried and fresh beans, plums, milk, paprika and cream called pavlaka and kajmak. Typical meat dishes include primarily beef and lamb. Some local specialties are ćevapi, burek, dolma, sarma, pilav (pilaf), gulaš (goulash), ajvar and a whole range of Eastern sweets. The best local wines come from Herzegovina where the climate is suitable for growing grapes. Plum or apple rakija, is produced in Bosnia.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/bosnian_and_herzegovina/",
            "dishes_count": 13,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Botswanian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Botswana",
            "description": "The cuisine of Botswana is unique but also shares some characteristics with other cuisines of Southern Africa. Examples of Setswana food include pap, samp, vetkoek, and mopane worms. A food unique to Botswana is seswaa, salted mashed-up meat. Watermelons are believed to have originated in Botswana.\r\nThe markets of Botswana are filled with a large variety of foods. Some are grown locally using irrigation and some are imported from neighbouring countries. A large quantity of high-quality beef is raised in Botswana. Lamb, mutton, chicken and other meats are also plentiful. Beef is the most popular meat, followed by goat meat. River fish are also part of Botswana cuisine.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/botswanian/",
            "dishes_count": 4,
            "pictures_count": 4
        },
        {
            "name": "Brazilian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Brazil",
            "description": "Brazilian cuisine has European, African and Amerindian influences. It varies greatly by region, reflecting the country's mix of native and immigrant populations, and its continental size as well. This has created a national cuisine marked by the preservation of regional differences.\r\n\r\nIngredients first used by native peoples in Brazil include cassava, guaraná, açaí, cumaru and tacacá. From there, the many waves of immigrants brought some of their typical dishes, replacing missing ingredients with local equivalents. For instance, the European immigrants (primarily from Portugal, Italy, Spain, Germany, Poland and Switzerland) were accustomed to a wheat-based diet, and introduced wine, leaf vegetables, and dairy products into Brazilian cuisine. When potatoes were not available they discovered how to use the native sweet manioc as a replacement. The African slaves also had a role in developing Brazilian cuisine, especially in the coastal states. The foreign influence extended to later migratory waves - Japanese immigrants brought most of the food items that Brazilians would associate with Asian cuisine today, and introduced large-scale aviaries, well into the 20th century.\r\n\r\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/brazilian/",
            "dishes_count": 83,
            "pictures_count": 89
        },
        {
            "name": "British",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "United Kingdom",
            "description": "British cuisine is the specific set of cooking traditions and practices associated with the United Kingdom. British cuisine has been described as \"unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it.\" However, British cuisine has absorbed the cultural influence of those who have settled in Britain, producing many hybrid dishes, such as the Anglo-Indian chicken tikka masala.\n\nFish and chips, a popular take-away food of the United Kingdom Celtic agriculture and animal breeding produced a wide variety of foodstuffs for indigenous Celts and Britons. Anglo-Saxon England developed meat and savory herb stewing techniques before the practice became common in Europe. The Norman conquest introduced exotic spices into England in the Middle Ages. The British Empire facilitated a knowledge of India's elaborate food tradition of \"strong, penetrating spices and herbs\". Food rationing policies, put in place by the British government during wartime periods of the 20th century, are said to have been the stimulus for British cuisine's poor international reputation. It has been claimed, contrary to popular belief, that people in southern England eat more garlic per head than the people of northern France.\n\nBritish cuisine has traditionally been limited in its international recognition to the full breakfast, fish and chips, and the Christmas dinner. Other British dishes include the Sunday roast, steak and kidney pie, shepherd's pie, and bangers and mash. British cuisine has many regional varieties within the broader categories of English, Scottish and Welsh cuisine. Each has developed its own regional or local dishes, many of which are geographically indicated foods such as Cornish pasties, the Yorkshire pudding, Cumberland Sausage, Arbroath Smokie, and Welsh cakes.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/british/",
            "dishes_count": 65,
            "pictures_count": 65
        },
        {
            "name": "Bruneian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Brunei",
            "description": "Bruneian cuisine is the cuisine of Brunei. It is similar to, and heavily influenced by the cuisine of neighbouring Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia, with additional influences from India, China, Thailand, and Japan. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/bruneian/",
            "dishes_count": 8,
            "pictures_count": 7
        },
        {
            "name": "Bulgarian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bulgaria",
            "description": "Cuisine from Bulgaria is a representative of the cuisine of Southeastern Europe. Essentially South Slavic, it shares characteristics with other Balkans cuisines. Bulgarian cooking traditions are diverse because of geographical factors such as climatic conditions suitable for a variety of vegetables, herbs and fruit. Aside from the vast variety of local Bulgarian dishes, Bulgarian cuisine shares a number of dishes with the Russian, Italian, Greek, cuisine and even Middle Eastern cuisines.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/bulgarian/",
            "dishes_count": 22,
            "pictures_count": 23
        },
        {
            "name": "Burkinabe",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Burkina Faso",
            "description": "Burkinabé cuisine, the cuisine of Burkina Faso, is similar to the cuisines in many parts of West Africa and is based on staple foods of sorghum, millet, rice, fonio, maize, peanuts, potatoes, beans, yams and okra. Rice, maize and millet are the most commonly eaten grains. Grilled meat is common, particularly mutton, goat, beef and fish. Vegetables include, besides yams and potatoes, okra, tomatoes, zucchini, carrots, leeks, onions, beets, pumpkins, cucumbers, cabbage, sorrel and spinach.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/burkinabe/",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Burmese",
            "othernames": "Myanmar",
            "territory": "Burma",
            "description": "Burmese cuisine includes dishes from various regions of the Southeast Asian country of Burma (now officially known as Myanmar). The diversity of Myanmar's cuisine has also been contributed to by the myriad of local ethnic minorities. The Bamars are the most dominant group, but other groups including the Chin people also have distinct cuisines.\n\nBurmese cuisine is characterized by extensive use of fish products like fish sauce and ngapi (fermented seafood). Owing to the geographic location of Myanmar, Burmese cuisine has been influenced by Chinese cuisine, Indian cuisine and Thai cuisine.\n\nWiki",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/burmese/",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Burundian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Burundi",
            "description": "Burundi cuisine is very representative of the African culinary culture, as it includes beans, which are the staple of Burundi cooking, exotic fruits (mainly bananas) plantains, sweet potatoes, cassava, peas, maize and cereals, like corn and wheat. Profiteroles are also sometimes enjoyed as a rare delicacy. Not much meat is consumed in Burundi because animal breeding is a secondary occupation; still, there are some dishes that include goat and sheep meat but cows are very sacred.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/burundian/",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Cambodian",
            "othernames": "Khmer",
            "territory": "Cambodia",
            "description": "Traditional cuisine of the people of Cambodia. Average meals typically consists of more than one dish and ideally contrasts flavours, textures and temperatures within the meal using plenty of herbs, leaves, pickled vegetables, dipping sauces, edible flowers and other garnishes and condiments.\n\nThe staple food for Cambodians is rice. Today rice is consumed by most Cambodians daily and with all meals, using a great number of cooking styles and techniques. There are hundreds of varieties of indigenous Khmer rice, from the fragrant jasmine-scented malis rice to countless types of wild, brown and sticky rice. Sticky rice is most often consumed as a dessert, often with slices of tropical fruit like mango or durian and coconut milk.\n\nRice is eaten throughout the day in the form of street-side snacks, such as deep-fried rice cakes with chives and spinach, for breakfast, as in Cambodia's famous rice noodle soup kuyteav or rice porridge, and in many desserts. Plain white rice is served with nearly every family meal, typically served with grilled freshwater fish, a samlor or soup, and an assortment of seasonal herbs, salad leaves and vegetables.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/cambodian/",
            "dishes_count": 33,
            "pictures_count": 40
        },
        {
            "name": "Cameroonian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cameroon",
            "description": "Cameroonian cuisine is one of the most varied in Africa due to its location on the crossroads between the north, west, and centre of the continent; the diversity in ethnicity with mixture ranging from Bantus, Semi-bantus and Shua-Arabs. Added to this is the influence of German colonialisation and later the French and English annexation of different parts of the country.\nThe soil of most of the country is very fertile and a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, both domestic and imported species, are grown. These include:\n\ncassava\nplantain\npeanuts\nfufu\nhot pepper/Penja white pepper\ncorn\neggplant\nokra\nbitterleaf\ntomato\ncocoyam\nbananas",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/cameroonian/",
            "dishes_count": 11,
            "pictures_count": 10
        },
        {
            "name": "Canadian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Canada",
            "description": "Cuisine from Canada varies widely depending on the regions of the nation. The three earliest cuisines of Canada have First Nations, English, Scottish and French roots, with the traditional cuisine of English Canada closely related to British cuisine, while the traditional cuisine of French Canada has evolved from French cuisine and the winter provisions of fur traders. With subsequent waves of immigration in the 19th and 20th century from Central, Southern, and Eastern Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and the Caribbean, the regional cuisines were subsequently augmented.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/canadian/",
            "dishes_count": 36,
            "pictures_count": 36
        }
    ]
}