GET /api/cuisines/?page=10
HTTP 200 OK
Allow: GET, HEAD, OPTIONS
Content-Type: application/json
Vary: Accept

{
    "count": 211,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=11",
    "previous": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?page=9",
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "South Sudanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "South Sudan",
            "description": "South Sudan cuisine is unsophisticated; the staples are bread, pancakes and porridge made from corn, sorghum, maize and other grains. Look out in particular for kisra, a wide, flat bread made from fermented sorghum flour; gurassa, a thick corn bread; and brown wheat poshto.\r\n\r\nA wide range of vegetables and pulses are available in the marketplace, many of them grown locally. In addition to potatoes, sweet potatoes, daal (lentils) and peas, you’ll find bamia (okra or ‘ladies fingers’), ful (mashed fava beans) and local specialities such as kudra (a leafy green vegetable rich in vitamins A and C), dodo (amaranth leaves), and pea leaves. Onions, tomatoes, peppers, cabbages, plantain bananas, cassava and carrots are imported from Uganda and Kenya.\r\n\r\nDuring mango season (March), you won’t be able to move for sweet, ripe mangoes and will happily be able to gorge yourself on them at rock-bottom prices. Each green mango hangs pendulously from the tree like a giant, round Christmas tree decoration, and when the fruits ripen, fall and bounce across the tin roofs, it can sound as if the sky is falling in. The markets also sell juicy pineapples, papayas (pawpaw) and oranges, apples, guava and avocados, although many of these are imported from neighbouring countries. Don’t miss sugarcane and sorghum stems: their juice is immensely sticky and sweet and chewing on them is a popular snack. Many types of foods are fried in cow brain rather than cooking fat as it gives a distinctive flavour and vegetarians should be aware that this applies as much to vegetables and pulses as to fish and meat. Meat (usually mutton or goat) is typically boiled or stewed, which helps to make it less tough, and it can be served with spices and peanut or simsim (sesame) sauce to add flavour. Dried or smoked beef is often eaten with peanut or groundnut sauce and may be made into a stew with bamia. A small amount of chicken is included in the diet, whilst pork is rarer as it has to be imported. Some communities eat fish from the rivers and swamps, and dried fish is oft en added to kajaik (a popular type of stew) or to aseeda (sorghum porridge) to give added flavour. A popular roadside snack is rolled eggs. There are relatively few desserts and sweets in South Sudan, although if you find them it is definitely worth trying the delicious, chewy macaroons made from peanuts, known locally as ful Sudani.\r\n\r\nhttps://www.bradtguides.com/destinations/africa/south-sudan/eating-and-sleeping.html",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/south_sudanese/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Spanish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Spain",
            "description": "Spanish cuisine is a way of preparing varied dishes, which is enriched by the culinary contributions of the various regions that make up the country. It is a cuisine influenced by the people who, throughout history, have conquered the territory of that country, as well by the subsequently colonized regions.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/spanish/",
            "dishes_count": 117,
            "pictures_count": 121
        },
        {
            "name": "Spanish-Andalusian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Spain, Andalusia",
            "description": "It is the cuisine of Andalusia, Spain. Notable dishes include gazpacho, fried fish (often called pescaíto frito in the local vernacular), the jamones of Jabugo, Valle de los Pedroches and Trevélez, and the wines of Jerez, particularly sherry. Frying in Andalucian cuisine is dominated by the use of olive oil that is produced in the provinces of Jaén, Córdoba, Seville, and Granada. Málaga, Almería, Cádiz and Huelva produces olive oil too, but in smaller amounts. The foods are dredged in flour a la andaluza (meaning only flour, without egg or other ingredients, but may include flour from the chickpea especially for use in batters). They are then fried in a large quantity of hot olive oil.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/spanish-andalusian/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Spanish-Asturian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Spain",
            "description": "Asturian cuisine refers to the typical dishes and ingredients found in the cuisine of the Asturias region of Spain.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/spanish-asturian/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Spanish-Galician",
            "othernames": "Gallega",
            "territory": "Galicia, Spain",
            "description": "It is refers to the typical dishes and ingredients found in the cuisine of the autonomous community of Galicia, Spain. These include shellfish, empanadas, polbo á feira (a dish made of octopus), the cheese queixo de tetilla, the ribeiro and albariño wines and orujo liquor.\r\nIn Galicia, a wide variety of sea produce can be found in traditional dishes, due to the province's long shoreline and traditional fishing economy. Agriculture products such as potatoes, maize and wheat are also staples in the Galician diet, along with dairy and meat products from animals such as cows, sheep and pigs; Galicia's grasses and shrubs are green year-round and are excellent for grazing.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/spanish-galician/",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "Sri Lankan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Sri Lanka",
            "description": "Sri Lankan cuisine has been shaped by many historical, cultural, and other factors. Foreign traders who brought new food items; influences from Indonesian cuisine and the cuisine of Southern India have all helped to shape Sri Lankan cuisine. Today, some of the staples of Sri Lankan cuisine are rice, coconut, and spices. The latter are used due to Sri Lanka's history as a spice producer and trading post over several centuries. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sri_Lankan_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/sri_lankan/",
            "dishes_count": 33,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "Sudanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Sudan",
            "description": "It is varied by region and greatly affected by the cross-cultural influences in Sudan throughout history. Meals include Elmaraara and Umfitit, which are made from sheep's offal (including the lungs, liver, and stomach), onions, peanut butter, and salt. They are eaten raw. Several stews, including Mullah, Waika, Bussaara, and Sabaroag use Ni'aimiya (Sudanese spice mix) and dried okra. Miris is a stew made from sheep's fat, onions, and dried okra. Sharmout Abiyad is made from dried meat, while Kajaik is made from dried fish. Stews are regularly eaten with a sorghum porridge called Asseeda or Asseeda Dukun. In Equatoria, Mouloukhiya (a local green vegetable) is added to the Asseeda. Sudanese soups include Kawari, made from cattle or sheep hooves with vegetables, and Elmussalammiya, made from liver, flour, dates, and spices.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/sudanese/",
            "dishes_count": 10,
            "pictures_count": 9
        },
        {
            "name": "Swedish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Sweden",
            "description": "These Swedish cuisine could be described as centered around cultured dairy products, crisp and soft (often sugared) breads, berries and stone fruits, beef, chicken, lamb, pork, and seafood. Potatoes are often served as a side dish, often boiled. Swedish cuisine has a huge variety of breads of different shapes and sizes, made of rye, wheat, oat, white, dark, sourdough, and whole grain, and including flatbreads and crispbreads. There are many sweetened bread types and some use spices. Many meat dishes, especially meatballs, are served with lingonberry jam. Fruit soups with high viscosity, like rose hip soup and blueberry soup (blåbärssoppa) served hot or cold, are typical of Swedish cuisine. \n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/swedish/",
            "dishes_count": 46,
            "pictures_count": 48
        },
        {
            "name": "Swiss",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Switzerland",
            "description": "The cuisine of Switzerland combines influences from the German, French and North Italian cuisine. However, it varies greatly from region to region with the language divisions constituting a rough boundary outline. Mind you, many dishes have crossed the local borders and become firm favourites throughout Switzerland.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/swiss/",
            "dishes_count": 37,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "Syrian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Syria",
            "description": "Syrian cuisine may refer to the cooking traditions and practices in modern-day Syria (as opposed to Greater Syria), merging the habits of people who settled in Syria throughout its history.\n\nSyrian cuisine mainly uses eggplant, zucchini, garlic, meat (mostly from lamb and sheep), sesame seeds, rice, chickpeas, fava beans, lentils, cabbage, cauliflower, vine leaves, pickled turnips, cucumbers, tomatoes, olive oil, lemon juice, mint, pistachios, honey and fruits.\n\nAt the beginning of the 21st century, selections of appetizers known as \"meze\" are customarily served along with Arabic bread before the Syrian meal's main course, which is followed by coffee, with sweet confectioneries or fruits at will. Many recipes date from at least the 13th century (Wikipedia)",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/syrian/",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 6
        },
        {
            "name": "Taiwanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Taiwan",
            "description": "Taiwanese cuisine itself is often associated with influences from mid to southern provinces of China, most notably from the province of Fujian (Hokkien), but influences from all of mainland China can easily be found. A notable Japanese influence also exists due to the period when Taiwan was under Japanese rule. Traditional Chinese food can be found in Taiwan, alongside Fujian and Hakka-style as well as native Taiwanese dishes, including dishes from Guangdong, Jiangxi, Chaoshan, Shanghai, Hunan, Sichuan and Beijing.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/taiwanese/",
            "dishes_count": 45,
            "pictures_count": 52
        },
        {
            "name": "Tanzanian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Tanzania",
            "description": "Tanzania, located on the East coast of Africa, has a cuisine that's been influenced by a number of cultures and flavors.\n\nIndian, Middle Eastern, and local African ingredients and cooking techniques are all fused together to form the base of food culture in Tanzania.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/tanzanian/",
            "dishes_count": 13,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Thai",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Thailand",
            "description": "Thai cuisine is the national cuisine of Thailand.\n\nThai cooking places emphasis on lightly prepared dishes with strong aromatic components and a spicy edge. It is known for its complex interplay of at least three and up to four or five fundamental taste senses in each dish or the overall meal: sour, sweet, salty, bitter and spicy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thai_cuisine\n\nBpu, Pu = Crab\nGai = Chicken\nGoong, Kung = Shrimp\nHed = Mushrooms\nKa = Galangal\nKai, Khai = Egg\nKai dao, Khai dao = Fried egg\nKhao = Rice\nkhing = Ginger\nKrob = Crispy\nKor, Ko = Pig neck meat\nLarb, Laab, Lahb = Type of salad based on minced meat\nMoo, Muu, Mu = Pork\nNam = Sauce?\nNue, Nua, Neau = Beef\nPad = Stir-fried\nPed, phed, ເຜັດ (Lao) = Spicy\nPing = Grilled with skewer\nPla, Plah = Fish\nPla duk = Catfish\nPla-ra = Fermented fish\nPrik, Pik, Phrik = Chili, Pepper\nSab, saeb, ແຊບ (Lao) = delicious, yummy\nTom, Tome = Boil\nWan = Sweet\nYang = Grill, Roasted\nYum = Salad (Mix with hands)",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/thai/",
            "dishes_count": 140,
            "pictures_count": 182
        },
        {
            "name": "Thai-isaan",
            "othernames": "Isaan",
            "territory": "Thailand",
            "description": "The Northeastern area of Thailand is known as Isaan Province (ภาคอีสาน ee-săan). It is surrounded by Laos to the North and East, Cambodia to the South, and Thailand to the West. Isaan is located on the Khorat Plateau with the great Mekong River bordering it’s Northern boundary. Around 21 million Thai’s are home to this territory, which happens to be famous for it’s cuisine!\n\nFamily gatherings are a huge part of the Isaan culture and food is always present. Meals are often leisurely periods of time to enjoy eating Thai food and times to socialize while eating an array of dishes. Sticky Rice is the staple and an abundant form of energy in Isaan.\n\nIssan has developed a multitude of outstanding dishes that have become famous throughout the world. Thai Papaya Salad also known as Som Tam originates from Isaan and is now one of the most sought after Thai dishes around. Meat salads like Larb Moo and Nam Tok Moo are hugely popular as well. Grilled meats are marinated before being char-broiled to maximize sensational flavor. Fish are often coated with a thick layer of salt before being grilled in order to retain natural moisture and add flavor. \n\nMost Isaan dishes served with sticky rice and are characterized by fiery chilies, strong fish sauces, sour bites, and flavorful saucy mixtures. Many dishes are prepared as salads with a spicy and sour (also fishy) sauce, convenient to be used as dipping sauces for balls of sticky rice. Some of the sauces are notorious for being pungent and smelly or even giving “tong sia,” stomach aches.\n\nhttps://www.eatingthaifood.com/isaan-food",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/thai-isaan/",
            "dishes_count": 12,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "-Tibetan-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Tibet",
            "description": "Tibetan cuisine includes the culinary traditions and practices of Tibet and its peoples, many of whom reside in India and Nepal. It reflects the Tibetan landscape of mountains and plateaus and includes influences from neighbors (including other countries India and Nepal). It is known for its use of noodles, goat, yak, mutton, dumplings, cheese (often from yak or goat milk), butter (also from animals adapted to the Tibetan climate) and soups.\n\nGrain, traditionally mostly barley, is the staple food of Tibetans. Meat and dairy products are an indispensable addition. Rice is only cultivated in the lower regions situated in the south of Tibet and is imported mainly. Vegetables and fruits were eaten rarely in Central Tibet until quite recently, because their cultivation was very difficult. Nowadays it is possible to grow these crops due to the construction of greenhouses. Following the different vegetative conditions, the Tibetan cuisine has a big variety.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/-tibetan-/",
            "dishes_count": 4,
            "pictures_count": 4
        },
        {
            "name": "Trinidad And Tobago",
            "othernames": "Trinidadian",
            "territory": "Trinidad And Tobago",
            "description": "Trinidad and Tobago’s enviable culinary landscape is a gastronomic narrative of flavours, encapsulating mouth-watering street food and fine dining cuisine. The unique cuisine of Trinidad and Tobago is a reflection of the country’s varied cultural influences, which includes Asian, African, Oriental, Creole and European delicacies - a journey around the world for your palate.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/trinidad_and_tobago/",
            "dishes_count": 6,
            "pictures_count": 6
        },
        {
            "name": "Tunisian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Tunisia",
            "description": "Tunisian cuisine, the cuisine of Tunisia, is a blend of Mediterranean and desert dwellers' culinary traditions. Its distinctive spicy fieriness comes from the many civilizations which have ruled the land now known as Tunisia: Romans, Vandals, Byzantines, Arabs, Spanish, Turkish, Italians, French, and the native Punics-Berber people. Many of the cooking styles and utensils began to take shape when the ancient tribes were nomads. Nomadic people were limited in their cooking implements by what pots and pans they could carry with them. The Tunisian tagine, is very different from the Moroccan dish. It is a type of a pie dish, made out of eggs, meat and vegetables, similar to the Italian frittata or the eggah.\n\nThe openness to trade and tourism also brought international cuisines, like the Chinese, Indian, Japanese cuisine, or fast-food. Moreover, the intensification of commercial exchange with Europe and the rest of the world, made certain uncommon products available, which in turn allowed locals to experiment with other cuisines.\n\nLike all countries in the Mediterranean basin, Tunisia offers a \"sun cuisine,\" based mainly on olive oil, spices, tomatoes, seafood and meat.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/tunisian/",
            "dishes_count": 18,
            "pictures_count": 18
        },
        {
            "name": "Turkish",
            "othernames": "Ottoman",
            "territory": "Turkey",
            "description": "The food of Turkey is the continuation of Ottoman cuisine, which in turn borrowed many elements from Central Asian, Caucasian, Jewish, Middle Eastern, Greek and Balkan cuisines. Turkish cuisine has in turn influenced those and other neighbouring cuisines, including those of Central and Western Europe. The Ottomans fused various culinary traditions of their realm with influences from Levantine cuisines, along with traditional Turkic elements from Central Asia (such as yogurt and mantı), creating a vast array of specialities—many with strong regional associations.\n\nTurkish cuisine varies across the country. The cooking of Istanbul, Bursa, Izmir, and rest of the Aegean region inherits many elements of Ottoman court cuisine, with a lighter use of spices, a preference for rice over bulgur, koftes and a wider availability of vegetable stews (türlü), eggplant, stuffed dolmas and fish. The cuisine of the Black Sea Region uses fish extensively, especially the Black Sea anchovy (hamsi) and includes maize dishes. The cuisine of the southeast (e.g. Urfa, Gaziantep, and Adana) is famous for its variety of kebabs, mezes and dough-based desserts such as baklava, şöbiyet, kadayıf, and künefe.\n\nbroad beans = bakla\ndill = dereotu",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/turkish/",
            "dishes_count": 143,
            "pictures_count": 152
        },
        {
            "name": "Turkmen",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Turkmenistan",
            "description": "The cuisine of Turkmenistan is similar to that of the rest of Central Asia. Plov (pilaf) is the staple, everyday food, which is also served at celebrations. It consists of chunks of mutton, carrots and rice fried in a large cast-iron cauldron similar to a Dutch oven. Manti is dumplings filled with ground meat, onions or pumpkin. Shurpa is a meat and vegetable soup. A wide variety of filled pies and fried dumplings are available in restaurants and bazaars, including somsa, gutap (often filled with spinach), and ishlykly. These are popular with travellers and taxi drivers, as they can be eaten quickly on the run, and are often sold at roadside stands. Turkmen cuisine does not generally use spices or seasonings and is cooked with large amounts of cottonseed oil for flavour.",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/turkmen/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Ugandan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Uganda",
            "description": "Ugandan cuisine consists of traditional and modern cooking styles, practices, foods, and dishes in Uganda, with English, Arab, and Asian (especially Indian) influences.\r\n\r\nMany dishes include various vegetables, potatoes, yams, bananas, and other tropical fruits.\r\n\r\nChicken, pork, fish (usually fresh, but there is also a dried variety, reconstituted for stewing), beef, goat, and mutton are all commonly eaten, although, among the rural poor, meats are consumed less than in other areas, and mostly eaten in the form of bushmeat. Nyama is the Bantu languages word for \"meat\".",
            "uri": "https://worldfood.guide/cuisine/ugandan/",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        }
    ]
}