GET /api/cuisines/
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{
    "count": 197,
    "next": "https://worldfood.guide/api/cuisines/?limit=100&offset=100",
    "previous": null,
    "results": [
        {
            "name": "Afghan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Afghanistan",
            "description": "The Cuisine from Afghanistan is largely based upon the nation's chief crops, such as wheat, maize, barley and rice. Accompanying these staples are native fruits and vegetables as well as dairy products such as milk, yogurt and whey. Kabuli Palaw is the national dish of Afghanistan. The nation's culinary specialties reflect its ethnic and geographic diversity. Afghanistan is known for its high quality pomegranates, grapes and sweet football-shaped melons.\r\n\r\nChaWal = Rice\r\nDhaniya = Coriander\r\nHaldi = Tumeric\r\nLaal Mirch = Red chilli\r\nLehsan Adrak = Ginger garlic\r\nMoong Daal (Chilky Vali) = Green gram split peas\r\nNamak = Salt\r\nPalak = Spinch\r\nPani = Water\r\nPyaaz = Onion\r\nQeema = Mince\r\nZeera = Cumin",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/afghan",
            "dishes_count": 36,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "-African-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Africa",
            "description": "Traditionally, the various cuisines of Africa use a combination of locally available fruits, cereal grains and vegetables, as well as milk and meat products, and do not usually get food imported. In some parts of the continent, the traditional diet features a lot of milk, curd and whey products.\n\nDepending on the region, there are also sometimes quite significant differences in the eating and drinking habits and proclivities throughout the continent's vast populations: Central Africa, East Africa, the Horn of Africa, North Africa, Southern Africa and West Africa each have their own distinctive dishes, preparation techniques, and consumption mores.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/-african-",
            "dishes_count": 37,
            "pictures_count": 37
        },
        {
            "name": "Albanian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Albania",
            "description": "It is a representative of the cuisine of the Mediterranean. It is an example of the Mediterranean diet due to the importance of olive oil, fruits, vegetables and fish. The cooking traditions of the Albanian people are diverse due to the environmental factors such as the geological and climatic conditions, which are suitable for the cultivation of nearly all kinds of herbs, vegetables and fruits. Nevertheless, olive oil is the most ancient and commonly used vegetable fat in Albanian cooking, which has been produced since antiquity throughout the country particularly along the coasts.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/albanian",
            "dishes_count": 10,
            "pictures_count": 10
        },
        {
            "name": "Algerian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Algeria",
            "description": "Algerian cuisine differs slightly from region to region. Every region has its own cuisine, including Kabylie, Algiers, and Constantine. Algerian Cuisine is influenced by various cultures such as Berber, Andalusian, Ottoman, Arabic, and French.It is a very rich cuisine but it still is not known around the world. Most of the Algerian dishes are centered around bread, lamb, beef or poultry, olive oil, fresh vegetables and fresh herbs. Traditionally, no Algerian meal is complete without bread, traditional bread is almost always made with semolina, french bread is also widespread. Pork consumption is forbidden to devout Muslim inhabitants of Algeria in accordance with Sharia, religious laws of Islam.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/algerian",
            "dishes_count": 7,
            "pictures_count": 7
        },
        {
            "name": "American",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "United States",
            "description": "The cuisine of the United States reflects its history. The European colonization of the Americas yielded the introduction of a number of ingredients and cooking styles to the latter. The various styles continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many foreign nations; such influx developed a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.\r\n\r\nEarly Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early american cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of american cuisine. When the colonists came to Virginia, Massachusetts, or any of the other English colonies on the eastern seaboard of north america, they farmed animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. They had cuisine similar to their previous British cuisine. the american colonial diet varied depending on the settled region in which someone lived. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, buffalo and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods. Prior to the revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the west indies. In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet and did not have a central region of culture.\r\n\r\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/cuisine_of_the_united_states",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/american",
            "dishes_count": 435,
            "pictures_count": 473
        },
        {
            "name": "American Chinese",
            "othernames": "Chinese American",
            "territory": "United States",
            "description": "Style of Chinese cuisine developed by Americans of Chinese descent. The dishes served in many North American Chinese restaurants are adapted to American tastes and differ significantly from those found in China. Of the various regional cuisines in China, Cantonese cuisine has been the most influential in the development of American Chinese food, especially that of Toisan, the origin of most early immigrants",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/american_chinese",
            "dishes_count": 29,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "American-Southern",
            "othernames": "Southern",
            "territory": "United States",
            "description": "The cuisine of the Southern United States is the historical regional culinary form of states generally south of the Mason–Dixon line dividing Pennsylvania and Delaware from Maryland as well as along the Ohio River, and extending west to southern Missouri, Oklahoma and Texas.\n\nThe most notable influences come from African, English, Scottish, Irish, German, French, and Native American cuisines. Tidewater, Appalachian ,Creole, Lowcountry, and Floribbean are examples of types Southern cuisine. In recent history, elements of Southern cuisine have spread north, having an effect on the development of other types of American cuisine.\n\nMany items such as squash, tomatoes, corn (and its derivatives, including grits), as well as the practice of deep pit barbecuing were inherited from the southeastern American Indian tribes such as the Caddo, Choctaw, and Seminole. Many foods associated with sugar, flour, milk, eggs (many kinds of baking or dairy products such as breads and cheeses) are more associated with Europe. Black-eyed peas, okra, rice, eggplant, benne (sesame) seed, sorghum, and melons, as well as the spices can be attributed to peoples of African origin.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_of_the_Southern_United_States",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/american-southern",
            "dishes_count": 33,
            "pictures_count": 36
        },
        {
            "name": "Argentine",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Argentina",
            "description": "Argentine cuisine may be described as a cultural blending of Indigenous, Mediterranean influences (such as those created by Italian and Spanish populations) within the wide scope of livestock and agricultural products that are abundant in the country 'Argentine Gastronomy'.\n\nArgentine annual consumption of beef has averaged 100 kg (220 lbs) per capita, approaching 180 kg (396 lbs) per capita during the 19th century; consumption averaged 67.7 kg (149 lbs) in 2007. Beyond asado (the Argentine barbecue), no other dish more genuinely matches the national identity. Nevertheless, the country's vast area, and its cultural diversity, have led to a local cuisine of various dishes.\n\nThe great immigratory waves consequently imprinted a large influence in the Argentine cuisine, after all Argentina was the second country in the world with the most immigrants with 6.6 million, only second to the United States with 27 million, and ahead of other immigratory receptor countries such as Canada, Brazil, Australia, etc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentine_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/argentine",
            "dishes_count": 45,
            "pictures_count": 54
        },
        {
            "name": "Armenian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Armenia",
            "description": "The cuisine from Armenia belongs to the family of Caucasian cuisines, and has strong ties with Turkish cuisine, Georgian cuisine, Persian cuisine, and Levantine cuisine.\n\nArmenian cuisine is similar to those of neighboring countries with many features but it differs from them a lot, too. For example, Armenians value the natural taste of food.\n\n- The flavor of the food relies on the quality and freshness of the ingredients rather than on excessive use of spices.\n\n- Fresh herbs are used extensively, both in the food and as accompaniments. Dried herbs are used in the winter, when fresh herbs are not available.\n\n- Wheat is the primary grain and is found in a variety of forms, such as: whole wheat, shelled wheat, bulgur (parboiled cracked wheat), semolina, farina, and flour. Historically, rice was used mostly in the cities (especially in areas with a large Turkish population) and in certain rice-growing areas (e.g., Marash and the region around Yerevan).\n\n- Legumes are used liberally, especially chick peas, lentils, white beans, and kidney beans.\nNuts are used both for texture and to add nutrition to Lenten dishes. Of primary usage are walnuts, almonds, pine nuts, but also hazelnuts, pistachios (in Cilicia), and nuts from regional trees.\n\n- Fresh and dried fruit are used both as main ingredients and as sour agents. As main ingredients, the following fruit are used: apricots (fresh and dried), quince, melons, and others. As sour agents, the following fruits are used: sumac berries (in dried, powdered form), sour grapes, plums (either sour or dried), pomegranate, apricots, cherries (especially sour cherries), and lemons.\n\n- In addition to grape leaves, cabbage leaves, chard, beet leaves, radish leaves, strawberry leaves, and others are also stuffed.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/armenian",
            "dishes_count": 17,
            "pictures_count": 16
        },
        {
            "name": "Aruban",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Aruba",
            "description": "Aruban cuisine is a fusion of African, Spanish, French, Dutch, Indian, and even Chinese cuisine. These traditions were brought from the many homelands of this region's population. Carnival Calamari, Keri Keri, Curry Goat/Chicken, Keshi Yena. Just replace the typical rice or potato with the Aruban typical side dish funchi or pan bati.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/aruban",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "Australian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Australia",
            "description": "Australian cuisine refers to the cuisine of Australia and its indigenous and colonial societies. Indigenous Australians have occupied Australia for some 40,000 to 60,000 years, during which they developed a unique hunter-gatherer diet, known as \"bush tucker\", drawn from regional Australian flora and fauna—such as the kangaroo. Australia was, from 1788 to 1900, a collection of British colonies in which culinary tastes were strongly influenced by British and Irish migrants - and agricultural products such as beef cattle, sheep and wheat became staples in the Australian diet. Post-war Australia's multicultural immigration program lead to a diversification of the cuisine of Australia, particularly under the influence of Mediterranean and East Asian Australians.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/australian",
            "dishes_count": 20,
            "pictures_count": 20
        },
        {
            "name": "Austrian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Austria",
            "description": "Over the hundreds of years of Austria's existence, a unique tradition of Austrian Cuisine has emerged. Its traditional and well-known recipes attract millions of tourists each year. Austria's rich Cuisine is a result of its history as a multi-national empire, where all kinds of different cultures contributed their very own nuances.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/austrian",
            "dishes_count": 11,
            "pictures_count": 11
        },
        {
            "name": "Azerbaijani",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Azerbaijan",
            "description": "Azerbaijani cuisine (Azerbaijani: Azərbaycan Mətbəxi, refers to the cooking styles and dishes of the Azeri in Azerbaijan republic and Iranian Azerbaijan. Its cuisine has a lot in common with Iranian and Turkish cuisine. Many foods that are indigenous to the country can now be seen in the cuisines of other neighboring cultures. For the Azerbaijanis, food is an important part of their culture and is deeply rooted in the history, traditions and values.\n\nOut of 11 climate zones known in the world, the Azerbaijani climate has nine.This contributes to the fertility of the land, which in its turn results in the richness of the cuisine.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/azerbaijani",
            "dishes_count": 29,
            "pictures_count": 29
        },
        {
            "name": "Azorean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "",
            "description": "The Azores is an archipelago of nine islands of various sizes, all of which are geographically isolated, both from the mainland and from each other. They lie in the Atlantic Ocean approximately two-thirds of the way between the United States and the coast of mainland Portugal. This is one of the main reasons that the food of the Azores is so little known.But here you will find the tstly dishes from Azorean cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/azorean",
            "dishes_count": 11,
            "pictures_count": 11
        },
        {
            "name": "Bahamian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bahamas",
            "description": "Bahamian Cuisine refers to the foods and beverages of the Bahamas. It includes seafood such as fish, shellfish, lobster, gumbo, crab, and conch, as well as tropical fruits, rice, peas, pigeon peas, potatoes, and pork. Popular seasonings commonly used in dishes include chilies (hot pepper), lime, cilantro, tomatoes, gumbo, onions, garlic, allspice, cinnamon, rum, and coconut. Rum-based beverages are popular on the island. Since the Bahamas consist of a multitude of islands, notable culinary variations exist.\n\nBahamian cuisines are somewhat related to the American South. A large portion of Bahamian foodstuffs are imported (cf. economy of the Bahamas). International cuisine is offered, especially at international hotels.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahamian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bahamian",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "Bahraini",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bahrain",
            "description": "The cuisine of Bahrain consists of dishes such as Biryani, Harees, Khabeesa, Machboos, Mahyawa, Maglooba, Qouzi and Zalabia. Qahwah is the national beverage. Bahrain is a small island state near the western shores of the Persian Gulf. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bahraini",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Balearic",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Balearic Islands",
            "description": "It is a Mediterranean cuisine as cooked in the Balearic Islands, Spain. It can be regarded as part of a wider Catalan cuisine, since it shares many dishes and ingredients with Catalonia and the Valencian Community. Others view it as part of a more global Spanish cuisine. Traditional Balearic cuisine is rich in vegetables, cereal and legumes as well as being low in fats. A succinct selection of the primary dishes would be ensaimades, seafood and vegetable stews, sobrassada, coques, tombet, Maó cheese and wine.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/balearic",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Balkans",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Balkans",
            "description": "Balkan cuisine is naturally eclectic because the region has experienced so many influences throughout the ages. From ancient Romans who strarted olive oil production to the Ottoman Turks in the Middle ages and finally the Italian and German influences have made their cuisines and gastronomic customs more sophisticated. However, the true spirit of the Balkans is in their mountains.\n\nMeat is the main ingredient: grilled, baked or smoked. In Christian countries they mainly eat pork, while Muslims prefer beef. There are about half a dozen meat specialties known under the common title of “roštilj” or “skara”, which comes from the name of the specific type of grill on which these meals are prepared. The most popular one, called ćevap (derived from the Turkish kebab), has quite a peculiar geography. Several Balkan cities compete for the title of the Balkan ćevap capital.\n\nhttps://travelsecretsmag.wordpress.com/2014/04/21/could-you-introduce-me-to-balkan-cuisine/",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/balkans",
            "dishes_count": 6,
            "pictures_count": 6
        },
        {
            "name": "Bangladeshi",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bangladesh",
            "description": "Bangladeshi cuisine (Bengali: বাংলাদেশের রান্না) is the national cuisine of Bangladesh. It is dominated by Bengali cuisine and has been shaped by the diverse history and riverine geography of Bangladesh. The country has a tropical monsoon climate.\n\nRice is the main staple of Bangladesh and is served with a wide range of curries. Sublime Bangladeshi dishes exhibit strong aromatic flavors; and often include eggs, potatoes, tomatoes and aubergines. A variety of spices and herbs, along with mustard oil and ghee, is used in Bangladeshi cooking. The main breads are naan, paratha, roti, bakarkhani and luchi. Dal is the second most important staple after rice. Fish is a staple in Bangladeshi cuisine, especially freshwater fish, which is a distinctive feature of the country's gastronomy. Major fish dishes include (ilish), pabda (butterfish), rui (rohu), pangash (pangas catfish), chitol (clown knifefish), magur (walking catfish), bhetki (barramundi) and tilapia. Meat consumption includes beef, lamb, venison, chicken, duck, squab and koel. Vegetable dishes, either mashed (bhurta), boiled (sabji), or leaf-based (saag), are widely served. Lobsters and shrimps are also often prevalent. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bangladeshi_cuisine\n\nmakha = kneaded\nkancha = raw\ngolla = ball",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bangladeshi",
            "dishes_count": 127,
            "pictures_count": 133
        },
        {
            "name": "Barbadian",
            "othernames": "Bajan, Barbados",
            "territory": "",
            "description": "Bajan cuisine is a mixture of African, Indian, Irish, Creole and British influences. A typical meal consists of a main dish of meat or fish, normally marinated with a mixture of herbs and spices, hot side dishes, and one or more salads. The meal is usually served with one or more sauces. \n\nThe national dish of Barbados is Cou-Cou & fried Flying Fish with spicy gravy.Another traditional meal is \"Pudding and Souse\" a dish of pickled pork with spiced sweet potatoes. A wide variety of seafood and meats are also available.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/barbadian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Bashkirs",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bashkortostan",
            "description": "The major activity of the Bashkir people was the seminomadic cattle breeding, and tribes followed the horse herds and sheep. This way of living provided the people with original culture, traditions, customs and peculiar national cuisine.\n\nThe combination of meat and milk products with grain and flour products became the basics of Bashkir people’s cuisine. They also used honey from wild and domestic bees, meat of woodland birds and animals, fish, roots, grass and berries.\n\nFirst of all, they ate the meat of domestic animals (horse, sheep, and cows), as well as the meat of the animals they hunted (hares, goats, elk, and bears). One of the most popular meals was Bishbarmak made of horsemeat or mutton showered with shurpa (broth). Bishbarmak is the most traditional and famous meals for hosting guests. It was made of fresh meat only. Meat was cooked for several hours, then cut into small pieces, added large pieces of noodles and dough. Bishbarmak means “five fingers” because they used hands to eat it.\n\n\nhttp://icg2013.openregion.info/eng/information/national-bashkir-cuisine/\n\n\n",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bashkirs",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Basque",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Basque Country",
            "description": "It is refers to the cuisine of the Basque Country and includes meats and fish grilled over hot coals, marmitako and lamb stews, cod, Tolosa bean dishes, paprikas from Lekeitio, pintxos (Basque tapas), Idiazabal sheep's cheese, txakoli sparkling wine, and Basque cider. A basquaise is a type of dish prepared in the style of Basque cuisine that often includes tomatoes and sweet or hot red peppers.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/basque",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Belarusian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Belarus",
            "description": "The cuisine from Belarus shares the same roots with cuisines of other Eastern and Northern European countries, basing predominantly on meat and various vegetables typical for the region.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/belarusian",
            "dishes_count": 24,
            "pictures_count": 21
        },
        {
            "name": "Belgian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Belgium",
            "description": "Belgian cuisine is widely varied with significant regional variations while also reflecting the cuisines of neighbouring France, Germany and the Netherlands. It is sometimes said that Belgian food is served in the quantity of German cuisine but with the quality of French food. Outside the country, Belgium is best known for its chocolate, waffles, fries and beer.\n\nThough Belgium has many distinctive national dishes, many internationally popular foods like hamburgers and spaghetti bolognese are also popular in Belgium, and most of what Belgians eat is also eaten in neighbouring countries. 'Belgian cuisine' therefore usually refers to dishes of Belgian origin, or those considered typically Belgian.\n\nBelgian cuisine traditionally prizes regional and seasonal ingredients. Ingredients typical in Belgian dishes include potatoes, leeks, grey shrimp, white asparagus, Belgian endives and local beer, in addition to common European staples including meat, cheese and butter. Belgians typically eat three meals a day, with a light breakfast, medium or large-sized lunch and small dinner.\n\nBelgium has a plethora of dishes and products that are local to a specific area. Examples include waterzooi from Ghent, the couque biscuit from the town of Dinant, and tarte au riz from Verviers. While their local origins are acknowledged, most such dishes are enjoyed throughout Belgium.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/belgian",
            "dishes_count": 35,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "Belizean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Belize",
            "description": "Belizean cuisine is an amalgamation of all ethnicities in the nation of Belize and their respectively wide variety of foods. Breakfast consists of bread, flour tortillas, or fry jacks that are often homemade. Fry jacks are eaten with various cheeses, refried beans, various forms of eggs or cereal, along with milk, coffee, or tea.\n\nMidday meals vary, from lighter foods such as rice and beans, tamales, panades (fried meat pies), escabeche (onion soup), chimole (soup), stew chicken and garnaches (fried tortillas with beans, cheese, and sauce) to various constituted dinners featuring some type of rice and beans, meat and salad or coleslaw.\n\nIn the rural areas meals may be more simplified than in the cities. The Maya use recado, corn or maize for most of their meals, and the Garifuna are fond of seafood, cassava (particularly made into cassava bread or Ereba) and vegetables. Belize abounds with restaurants and fast food establishments selling fairly cheaply. Local fruits are quite common, but raw vegetables from the markets less so. Mealtime is a communion for families and schools and some businesses close at midday for lunch, reopening later in the afternoon.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/belizean",
            "dishes_count": 3,
            "pictures_count": 3
        },
        {
            "name": "Beninese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Benin",
            "description": "Beninese cuisine is known in Africa for its exotic ingredients and flavorful dishes. Beninese cuisine involves lots of fresh meals served with a variety of sauces. Meat is usually quite expensive, and meals are generally light on meat and generous on vegetable fat.\n\nIn southern Benin cuisine, the most common ingredient is corn, often used to prepare dough which is mainly served with peanut- or tomato-based sauces. Fish and chicken are the most common meats used in southern Beninese cuisine, but beef, pork, goat and bush rat are also consumed. Meats are often fried in palm or peanut oil. Rice, beans, tomatoes and couscous are also significant staple foods. Fruits are common in this region, including mandarin oranges, oranges, bananas, kiwi, avocados, pineapples and peanuts.\n\nYams are the main staple in the northern Benin, and are also often served with peanut- or tomato-based sauces. The population in the northern provinces uses beef and pork meat which is also fried in palm or peanut oil or cooked in sauces. Cheese is also frequently used in some dishes. Couscous, rice and beans are also commonly eaten, along with fruits such as mangos, oranges, and avocados.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/beninese",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Bermudian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bermuda",
            "description": "Bermudian cuisine is the cuisine of the British Overseas Territory of Bermuda. The cuisine of the islands reflects a rich and diverse history and heritage blending English cuisine and Portuguese cuisine with preparations of local seafood species, particularly wahoo and rockfish. Traditional dishes include codfish and potatoes served either with an add on of hard boiled egg and butter or olive oil sauce with a banana or in the Portuguese style with tomato-onion sauce, peas and rice. Hoppin' John, pawpaw casserole and fish chowder are also a specialties of Bermuda. As most ingredients used in Bermuda’s cuisine are imported, local dishes are offered with a global blend, with fish as the major ingredient, in any food eaten at any time.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bermudian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Bhutanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bhutan",
            "description": "Bhutanese cuisine (Dzongkha: འབྲུག་ཟས་; Wylie: brug-zas) employs a lot of red rice (like brown rice in texture, but with a nutty taste, the only variety of rice that grows at high altitudes), buckwheat, and increasingly maize. Buckwheat is eaten mainly in Bumthang, maize in the Eastern districts, and rice elsewhere. The diet in the hills also includes chicken, yak meat, dried beef, pork, pork fat, and lamb. Soups and stews of meat, rice, ferns, lentils, and dried vegetables, spiced with chili peppers and cheese, are a favorite meal during the cold seasons. Zow shungo is a rice dish mixed with leftover vegetables. Ema datshi is a spicy dish made with large, green chili peppers in a cheesy sauce (similar to chili con queso), which might be called the national dish for its ubiquity and the pride that Bhutanese have for it.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bhutanese_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bhutanese",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 20
        },
        {
            "name": "Bolivian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bolivia",
            "description": "Bolivian cuisine is very varied and stems from the combination of Spanish cuisine with Indigenous ingredients and Aymara traditions among others, with later influences from Argentinians, Germans, Italians, Basques, Russians, Poles, and Arabs due to the arrival of immigrants from those countries. The three traditional staples of Bolivian cuisine are corn, potatoes, and beans. These ingredients have been combined with a number of staples brought by the Spanish, such as rice, wheat, and meat, including beef, pork, and chicken.\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolivian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bolivian",
            "dishes_count": 37,
            "pictures_count": 54
        },
        {
            "name": "Bosnian And Herzegovina",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bosnia And Herzegovina",
            "description": "Bosnian cuisine uses many spices, but usually in moderate quantities. Most dishes are light, as they are cooked in lots of water; the sauces are fully natural, consisting of little more than the natural juices of the vegetables in the dish. Typical ingredients include tomatoes, potatoes, onions, garlic, bell peppers, cucumbers, carrots, cabbage, mushrooms, spinach, courgette, dried and fresh beans, plums, milk, paprika and cream called pavlaka and kajmak. Typical meat dishes include primarily beef and lamb. Some local specialties are ćevapi, burek, dolma, sarma, pilav (pilaf), gulaš (goulash), ajvar and a whole range of Eastern sweets. The best local wines come from Herzegovina where the climate is suitable for growing grapes. Plum or apple rakija, is produced in Bosnia.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bosnian_and_herzegovina",
            "dishes_count": 12,
            "pictures_count": 12
        },
        {
            "name": "Botswanian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Botswana",
            "description": "The cuisine of Botswana is unique but also shares some characteristics with other cuisines of Southern Africa. Examples of Setswana food include pap, samp, vetkoek, and mopane worms. A food unique to Botswana is seswaa, salted mashed-up meat. Watermelons are believed to have originated in Botswana.\r\nThe markets of Botswana are filled with a large variety of foods. Some are grown locally using irrigation and some are imported from neighbouring countries. A large quantity of high-quality beef is raised in Botswana. Lamb, mutton, chicken and other meats are also plentiful. Beef is the most popular meat, followed by goat meat. River fish are also part of Botswana cuisine.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/botswanian",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Brazilian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Brazil",
            "description": "Brazilian cuisine has European, African and Amerindian influences. It varies greatly by region, reflecting the country's mix of native and immigrant populations, and its continental size as well. This has created a national cuisine marked by the preservation of regional differences.\r\n\r\nIngredients first used by native peoples in Brazil include cassava, guaraná, açaí, cumaru and tacacá. From there, the many waves of immigrants brought some of their typical dishes, replacing missing ingredients with local equivalents. For instance, the European immigrants (primarily from Portugal, Italy, Spain, Germany, Poland and Switzerland) were accustomed to a wheat-based diet, and introduced wine, leaf vegetables, and dairy products into Brazilian cuisine. When potatoes were not available they discovered how to use the native sweet manioc as a replacement. The African slaves also had a role in developing Brazilian cuisine, especially in the coastal states. The foreign influence extended to later migratory waves - Japanese immigrants brought most of the food items that Brazilians would associate with Asian cuisine today, and introduced large-scale aviaries, well into the 20th century.\r\n\r\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brazilian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/brazilian",
            "dishes_count": 80,
            "pictures_count": 84
        },
        {
            "name": "British",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "United Kingdom",
            "description": "British cuisine is the specific set of cooking traditions and practices associated with the United Kingdom. British cuisine has been described as \"unfussy dishes made with quality local ingredients, matched with simple sauces to accentuate flavour, rather than disguise it.\" However, British cuisine has absorbed the cultural influence of those who have settled in Britain, producing many hybrid dishes, such as the Anglo-Indian chicken tikka masala.\n\nFish and chips, a popular take-away food of the United Kingdom Celtic agriculture and animal breeding produced a wide variety of foodstuffs for indigenous Celts and Britons. Anglo-Saxon England developed meat and savory herb stewing techniques before the practice became common in Europe. The Norman conquest introduced exotic spices into England in the Middle Ages. The British Empire facilitated a knowledge of India's elaborate food tradition of \"strong, penetrating spices and herbs\". Food rationing policies, put in place by the British government during wartime periods of the 20th century, are said to have been the stimulus for British cuisine's poor international reputation. It has been claimed, contrary to popular belief, that people in southern England eat more garlic per head than the people of northern France.\n\nBritish cuisine has traditionally been limited in its international recognition to the full breakfast, fish and chips, and the Christmas dinner. Other British dishes include the Sunday roast, steak and kidney pie, shepherd's pie, and bangers and mash. British cuisine has many regional varieties within the broader categories of English, Scottish and Welsh cuisine. Each has developed its own regional or local dishes, many of which are geographically indicated foods such as Cornish pasties, the Yorkshire pudding, Cumberland Sausage, Arbroath Smokie, and Welsh cakes.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/british",
            "dishes_count": 61,
            "pictures_count": 61
        },
        {
            "name": "Bruneian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Brunei",
            "description": "Bruneian cuisine is the cuisine of Brunei. It is similar to, and heavily influenced by the cuisine of neighbouring Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia, with additional influences from India, China, Thailand, and Japan. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bruneian",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Bulgarian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bulgaria",
            "description": "Cuisine from Bulgaria is a representative of the cuisine of Southeastern Europe. Essentially South Slavic, it shares characteristics with other Balkans cuisines. Bulgarian cooking traditions are diverse because of geographical factors such as climatic conditions suitable for a variety of vegetables, herbs and fruit. Aside from the vast variety of local Bulgarian dishes, Bulgarian cuisine shares a number of dishes with the Russian, Italian, Greek, cuisine and even Middle Eastern cuisines.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/bulgarian",
            "dishes_count": 21,
            "pictures_count": 21
        },
        {
            "name": "Burkinabe",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Burkina Faso",
            "description": "Burkinabé cuisine, the cuisine of Burkina Faso, is similar to the cuisines in many parts of West Africa and is based on staple foods of sorghum, millet, rice, fonio, maize, peanuts, potatoes, beans, yams and okra. Rice, maize and millet are the most commonly eaten grains. Grilled meat is common, particularly mutton, goat, beef and fish. Vegetables include, besides yams and potatoes, okra, tomatoes, zucchini, carrots, leeks, onions, beets, pumpkins, cucumbers, cabbage, sorrel and spinach.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/burkinabe",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Burmese",
            "othernames": "Myanmar",
            "territory": "Burma",
            "description": "Burmese cuisine includes dishes from various regions of the Southeast Asian country of Burma (now officially known as Myanmar). The diversity of Myanmar's cuisine has also been contributed to by the myriad of local ethnic minorities. The Bamars are the most dominant group, but other groups including the Chin people also have distinct cuisines.\n\nBurmese cuisine is characterized by extensive use of fish products like fish sauce and ngapi (fermented seafood). Owing to the geographic location of Myanmar, Burmese cuisine has been influenced by Chinese cuisine, Indian cuisine and Thai cuisine.\n\nWiki",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/burmese",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Burundian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Burundi",
            "description": "Burundi cuisine is very representative of the African culinary culture, as it includes beans, which are the staple of Burundi cooking, exotic fruits (mainly bananas) plantains, sweet potatoes, cassava, peas, maize and cereals, like corn and wheat. Profiteroles are also sometimes enjoyed as a rare delicacy. Not much meat is consumed in Burundi because animal breeding is a secondary occupation; still, there are some dishes that include goat and sheep meat but cows are very sacred.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/burundian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Cambodian",
            "othernames": "Khmer",
            "territory": "Cambodia",
            "description": "Traditional cuisine of the people of Cambodia. Average meals typically consists of more than one dish and ideally contrasts flavours, textures and temperatures within the meal using plenty of herbs, leaves, pickled vegetables, dipping sauces, edible flowers and other garnishes and condiments.\n\nThe staple food for Cambodians is rice. Today rice is consumed by most Cambodians daily and with all meals, using a great number of cooking styles and techniques. There are hundreds of varieties of indigenous Khmer rice, from the fragrant jasmine-scented malis rice to countless types of wild, brown and sticky rice. Sticky rice is most often consumed as a dessert, often with slices of tropical fruit like mango or durian and coconut milk.\n\nRice is eaten throughout the day in the form of street-side snacks, such as deep-fried rice cakes with chives and spinach, for breakfast, as in Cambodia's famous rice noodle soup kuyteav or rice porridge, and in many desserts. Plain white rice is served with nearly every family meal, typically served with grilled freshwater fish, a samlor or soup, and an assortment of seasonal herbs, salad leaves and vegetables.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/cambodian",
            "dishes_count": 32,
            "pictures_count": 39
        },
        {
            "name": "Cameroonian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cameroon",
            "description": "Cameroonian cuisine is one of the most varied in Africa due to its location on the crossroads between the north, west, and centre of the continent; the diversity in ethnicity with mixture ranging from Bantus, Semi-bantus and Shua-Arabs. Added to this is the influence of German colonialisation and later the French and English annexation of different parts of the country.\nThe soil of most of the country is very fertile and a wide variety of vegetables and fruits, both domestic and imported species, are grown. These include:\n\ncassava\nplantain\npeanuts\nfufu\nhot pepper/Penja white pepper\ncorn\neggplant\nokra\nbitterleaf\ntomato\ncocoyam\nbananas",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/cameroonian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Canadian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Canada",
            "description": "Cuisine from Canada varies widely depending on the regions of the nation. The three earliest cuisines of Canada have First Nations, English, Scottish and French roots, with the traditional cuisine of English Canada closely related to British cuisine, while the traditional cuisine of French Canada has evolved from French cuisine and the winter provisions of fur traders. With subsequent waves of immigration in the 19th and 20th century from Central, Southern, and Eastern Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and the Caribbean, the regional cuisines were subsequently augmented.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/canadian",
            "dishes_count": 32,
            "pictures_count": 32
        },
        {
            "name": "Canarian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Canary Islands",
            "description": "It refers to the typical dishes and ingredients in the cuisine of the Canary Islands, and it constitutes an important element in the culture of its inhabitants. Its main features are its freshness, variety, simplicity, and the richness of its ingredients (which may be a result of the long geographical isolation the islands suffered), the mix of seafood and meat dishes, its cultural influences and the low knowledge of it by the rest of the world.\n\nMany small dishes are presented in the Canary Islands as appetizers, or snacks (tapas), which are known locally as enyesques.\n\nMojo (pronounced mO-ho) is a sauce served with many dishes, which is made mainly of oil, garlic, vinegar, salt, red pepper, thyme, cumin, coriander and several other spices. The two main kinds of mojo are rojo (red, often served with meat) and verde (green, often served with fish), though both can be served with potatoes. Spicy red mojo is called mojo picón. This recipe is the base of the mojos of Latin America, especially Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela, due to heavy Canarian emigration, and have also influenced the cuisines of the non-Hispanic Caribbean islands.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canarian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/canarian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Cape Verdean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cape Verde",
            "description": "The cuisine of Cape Verde is a West African cuisine largely influenced by Portuguese, Southern and Western European and West African cuisine. Cape Verde was a colony of Portugal from its colonization until 1975.One of the most important aspects of Cape Verdean culture is the beverage grogue, a strong rum made from distilled sugar cane on the islands of Santo Antao and Santiago. The beverage is made in towns such as Paul on Santo Antao and Cidade Velha on Santiago using a trapiche. A variation of the drink is ponche (punch) which is sweeted with condensed milk or sugarcane molasses. Due to the intoxication on consuming grogue, it is consumed by many Cape Verdean musicians seeking inspiration.\n\nCorn and beans are staples of Cape Verdean cuisine.Also popular are rice, fried potatoes, cassava and vegetables such as carrots, kale, squash, fish and meat such as tuna, sawfish, lobster, chicken, grilled pork and eggs. One legacy of the Portuguese on the islands is olives and Alentejo wines which are still imported. One type of Cape Verdean stew is a cachupa .",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/cape_verdean",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "-Caribbean-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cuba, Haiti, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago, Bahamas, Barbados, Saint Lucia",
            "description": "Of or relating to the Caribbean Sea, its islands, or its Central or South American coasts or to the peoples or cultures of this region.\n\nTop Caribbean Countries by population:\n- Cuba\n- Haiti\n- Dominican Republic\n- Puerto Rico\n- Jamaica\n- Trinidad and Tobago\n- Guadeloupe\n- Martinique\n- Bahamas\n- Barbados\n- Saint Lucia\n- Curacao\n- Aruba\n",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/-caribbean-",
            "dishes_count": 20,
            "pictures_count": 22
        },
        {
            "name": "Catalan",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Catalonia",
            "description": "It is the cuisine of the autonomous community of Catalonia. It relies heavily on ingredients popular along the Mediterranean coast, including fresh vegetables (especially tomato, garlic, eggplant (aubergine), capsicum, and artichoke), wheat products (bread, pasta), Arbequina olive oils, wines, legumes (beans, chickpeas), mushrooms, all sorts of pork preparations (sausage from Vic, ham), all sorts of cheese, poultry, lamb, and many types of fish like sardine, anchovy, tuna, and cod.\n\nThe traditional Catalan cuisine is quite diverse, ranging from pork-intensive dishes cooked in the inland part of the region (Catalonia is one of the main producers of swine products in Spain) to fish-based recipes along the coast.\n\nThe cuisine includes many preparations that mix sweet and savoury and stews with sauces based upon botifarra (pork sausage) and the characteristic picada (ground almonds, hazelnuts, pine nuts, etc. sometimes with garlic, herbs, biscuits)",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/catalan",
            "dishes_count": 4,
            "pictures_count": 4
        },
        {
            "name": "Caucasian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Caucasus, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Dagestan, Chechnya, Abkhazia, Adjaria, Adygea",
            "description": "Cuisine from the geographic region Caucasus or Caucasia includes the traditional cuisines of Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Dagestan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Kabardino-Balkaria, Karachay–Cherkessia, North Ossetia–Alania, South Ossetia, Abkhazia, Adjaria, and Adygea.\n\nThese cuisines provide a dash of spice and colour compared with often stodgy Russian dishes. Although often characterized as quite meat-heavy - a staple of Caucasian and Central Asian cuisine in Russia is the fabulous Shashlik (kebabs) which appear on every menu. Food from this part of the world is also a good option for vegetarian, making use of the vegetables and pulses native to that part of the world.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/caucasian",
            "dishes_count": 10,
            "pictures_count": 11
        },
        {
            "name": "Chadian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Chad",
            "description": "Chadian cuisine is the cooking traditions, practices, foods and dishes associated with the Republic of Chad. Chadians use a variety of grains, vegetables, fruits and meats. Commonly consumed grains include millet, sorghum, and rice as staple foods. Commonly eaten vegetables include okra and cassava. A variety of fruits are also eaten. Meats include mutton, chicken, pork, goat, fish, lamb and beef. The day's main meal is typically consumed in the evening on a large communal plate, with men and women usually eating in separate areas. This meal is typically served on the ground upon a mat, with people sitting and eating around it.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/chadian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Chilean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Chile",
            "description": "Cuisine from Chile stems mainly from the combination of traditional Spanish cuisine, Chilean Indigenous Mapuche culture and local ingredients, with later important influences from other European cuisines, particularly from Germany, Italy and France. The food tradition and recipes in Chile are notable for the variety of flavours and ingredients, with the country’s diverse geography and climate hosting a wide range of agricultural produce, fruits and vegetables. The long coastline and the peoples' relationship with the Pacific Ocean add an immense array of seafood products to Chilean cuisine, with the country's waters home to unique species of fish, molluscs, crustaceans and algae, thanks to the oxygen-rich water carried in by the Humboldt Current. Chile is also one of the world’s largest producers of wine and many Chilean recipes are enhanced and accompanied by local wines.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/chilean",
            "dishes_count": 58,
            "pictures_count": 81
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Chinese cuisine is the national cuisine of China.\n\nChinese cuisine includes styles originating from the diverse regions of China, as well as from Chinese people in other parts of the world. The history of Chinese cuisine in China stretches back for thousands of years and has changed from period to period and in each region according to climate, imperial fashions, and local preferences. Over time, techniques and ingredients from the cuisines of other cultures were integrated into the cuisine of the Chinese people due both to imperial expansion and from the trade with nearby regions in pre-modern times, and from Europe and the New World in the modern period.\n\nStyles and tastes also varied by class, region, and ethnic background. This led to an unparalleled range of ingredients, techniques, dishes and eating styles in what could be called Chinese food, leading Chinese to pride themselves on eating a wide variety of foods while remaining true to the spirit and traditions of Chinese food culture.\n\nWiki",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese",
            "dishes_count": 188,
            "pictures_count": 228
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese-Cantonese",
            "othernames": "Yue",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Cantonese Cuisine, also known as Yue Cuisine, is the culinary style of Guangdong Province, which was called Canton when the Wade-Giles romanization of Chinese was in use. This particular type of Chinese food has been popularized by Chinese restaurants around the world as the majority of those who set up these restaurants were of Cantonese origin.\n\nGuangdong dishes are characterized by their tender and slightly sweet taste. Sauces are a crucial seasoning in Guangdong cuisine. Classic Cantonese sauces are light and mellow. The most widely used sauces in Guangdong Cuisine include: hoisin sauce, oyster sauce, plum sauce and sweet and sour sauce. Other ingredients popular in Guangdong Cuisine include spring onions, sugar, salt, soya bean products, rice wine, corn starch, vinegar and sesame oil. Garlic is used heavily in some dishes, especially those in which internal organs, such as entrails, may emit unpleasant odors. Ginger, chili peppers, five-spice powder, powdered white pepper, star anise and a few other spices are used, but often sparingly.\n\nThe raw materials for Guangdong Cuisine are very plentiful. \"The Chinese eat everything with four legs, except tables, and everything that flies except airplanes\" is the most suitable expression of the countless variety of Guangdong food. Things that are rarely eaten or rarely seen on Western tables are commonly used in Guangdong dishes. Snake, cat and pangolin (scaly anteater) are considered by the Cantonese people to be most delicious food.\n\nIn contrast to the fast-fried cooking method of Sichuan dishes, Guangdong people prefer to braise, stew and sauté their food. These cooking methods aim to preserve the flavor of the dishes. http://www.chinahighlights.com/travelguide/chinese-food/yue-cuisine.htm\n",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese-cantonese",
            "dishes_count": 10,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese-Shanghainese",
            "othernames": "Hu",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Shanghai cuisine, also known as Hu cuisine, is popular style of Chinese food. In a narrow sense, Shanghai cuisine refers only to what is traditionally called Benbang cuisine (???, lit. \"local cuisine\") which originated in Shanghai; in a broad sense,it refers to complex and developed styles of cooking under profound influence of those of the surrounding provinces – Jiangsu and Zhejiang –. It takes \"color, aroma and taste\" as its elements like other Chinese regional cuisines, and emphasizes in particular the use of seasonings,the quality of raw materials and original flavors. \nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanghai_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese-shanghainese",
            "dishes_count": 12,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "Chinese-Sichuan",
            "othernames": "Szechwan, Szechuan",
            "territory": "China",
            "description": "Style of Chinese cuisine originating from Sichuan province in southwestern China. It has bold flavours, particularly the pungency and spiciness resulting from liberal use of garlic and chili peppers, as well as the unique flavor of the Sichuan pepper. There are many local variations within Sichuan province and the Chongqing municipality, which was part of Sichuan until 1997. Four sub-styles include Chongqing, Chengdu, Zigong, and Buddhist vegetarian style.\n\nUNESCO declared Chengdu to be a city of gastronomy in 2011 in order to recognize the sophistication of its cooking. (Wikipedia)",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/chinese-sichuan",
            "dishes_count": 17,
            "pictures_count": 23
        },
        {
            "name": "Circassian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Circassia",
            "description": "Adyghe cuisine consists of many different traditional dishes, varying by season. The summertime traditional dishes are mainly dairy products and vegetables.In winter and spring, the traditional dishes mostly consist of flour and meat. Traditional dishes include ficcin, seasoned chicken or turkey with sauce, boiled mutton and beef with a seasoning of sour milk along with salt and crushed garlic.\n\nAmong the many varieties of cheese in the North Caucasus, Circassian cheese is the most popular one.\n\nDifferent variants of pasta can be found in Circassia, one such type is the manti that is filled with potato or lamb, and served with butter, yoghurt, and spices. Manti is similar to ravioli, but it is served with butter and yoghurt, though sometimes tomato can be added as well. Manti may be fried, as well as boiled.\n\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circassian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/circassian",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Colombian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Colombia",
            "description": "Colombian cuisine includes the cooking traditions and practices of Colombia's Caribbean shoreline, Pacific coast, mountains, jungle, and ranchlands. Colombian cuisine varies regionally and is influenced by the Indigenous Chibcha, Spanish, African, Arab and some Asian influences. Colombian coffee is renowned for its high quality. (Wiki)",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/colombian",
            "dishes_count": 55,
            "pictures_count": 71
        },
        {
            "name": "Congolese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Democratic Republic Of The Congo",
            "description": "The cuisine of the Democratic Republic of the Congo varies widely, representing the food of indigenous people. Cassava is generally the staple food usually eaten with other side dishes. Wikipedia",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/congolese",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Costa Rican",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Costa Rica",
            "description": "Costa Rican cuisine is known for being fairly mild, with high reliance on fresh fruits and vegetables. Rice and black beans are a staple of most traditional Costa Rican meals, often served three times a day.\n\nCosta Rican fare is nutritionally well rounded, and nearly always cooked from scratch from fresh ingredients. Traditional meals have a home-cooked, comforting feel to them. Due to the tropical location of the country, there are many exotic fruits and vegetables readily available and included in the local cuisine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Costa_Rican_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/costa_rican",
            "dishes_count": 9,
            "pictures_count": 13
        },
        {
            "name": "Crimean Tatars",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Crimean Tatars",
            "description": "The traditional cuisine of the Crimean Tatars derives basically from the same roots as the cuisine of the Volga Tatars, although unlike the Volga Tatars they do not eat horse meat and do not drink mare’s milk (kymyz). However, the Crimean Tatars adopted many Uzbek dishes during their exile in Central Asia since 1944, and these dishes have been absorbed into Crimean Tatar national cuisine after their return to Crimea. Uzbek samsa, laghman, and plov (pilaf) are sold in most Tatar roadside cafes in Crimea as national dishes. Uzbek flatbread, nan (or lepyoshka in Russian), is also a staple among Crimean Tatars.\n\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crimean_Tatar_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/crimean_tatars",
            "dishes_count": 0,
            "pictures_count": 0
        },
        {
            "name": "Croatian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Croatia",
            "description": "It is heterogeneous and is known as a cuisine of the regions since every region of Croatia has its own distinct culinary tradition. Its roots date back to ancient times. The differences in the selection of foodstuffs and forms of cooking are most notable among those in the mainland and those in coastal regions. Mainland cuisine is more characterized by the earlier Slavic and the more recent contacts with neighbouring cultures—Hungarian and Turkish, using lard for cooking, and spices such as black pepper, paprika, and garlic. The coastal region bears the influences of the Greek and Roman cuisine, as well as of the later Mediterranean cuisine, in particular Italian (especially Venetian). Coastal cuisines use olive oil, and herbs and spices such as rosemary, sage, bay leaf, oregano, marjoram, cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, and lemon and orange rind. Peasant cooking traditions are based on imaginative variations of several basic ingredients (cereals, dairy products, meat, fish, vegetables, nuts) and cooking procedures (stewing, grilling, roasting, baking), while bourgeois cuisine involves more complicated procedures and use of selected herbs and spices. Charcuterie is part of Croatian tradition in all regions. Food and recipes from other former Yugoslav countries are also popular in Croatia.\n\nCroatian cuisine can be divided into a few regional cuisines (Istria, Dalmatia, Dubrovnik, Lika, Gorski Kotar, Zagorje, Međimurje, Podravina, Slavonija) which all have their specific cooking traditions, characteristic for the area and not necessarily well known in other parts of Croatia. Most dishes, however, can be found all across the country, with local variants.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/croatian",
            "dishes_count": 20,
            "pictures_count": 20
        },
        {
            "name": "Cuban",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cuba",
            "description": "Cuban cuisine is a fusion of Native American Taino food, Spanish, African, and Caribbean cuisines. Some Cuban recipes share spices and techniques with Spanish and African cooking, with some Caribbean influence in spice and flavor. This results in a unique, interesting and flavorful blend of the several different cultural influences, with strong similarities with the cuisine of the neighboring Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. A small but noteworthy Chinese influence can also be accounted for, mainly in the Havana area. During colonial times, Cuba was an important port for trade, and many Spaniards who lived there brought their culinary traditions along with them.\n\n\nAs a result of the colonization of Cuba by Spain, one of the main influences on the cuisine is from Spain. Along with Spain, other culinary influences include Africa, from the Africans that were brought to Cuba as slaves, and French, from the French colonists that came to Cuba from Haiti.Another important factor is that Cuba itself is an island, making seafood something that greatly influences Cuban cuisine. Another contributing factor to Cuban cuisine is the fact that Cuba is in a tropical climate. The tropical climate produces fruits and root vegetables that are used in Cuban dishes and meals\n\nWiki",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/cuban",
            "dishes_count": 38,
            "pictures_count": 63
        },
        {
            "name": "Cypriot",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Cyprus",
            "description": "Cuisine of Cyprus and is closely related to Greek and Turkish cuisine; it has also been influenced by Byzantine, French, Italian, Catalan, Ottoman and Middle Eastern cuisines.\n\nFrequently used ingredients are fresh vegetables such as zucchini, green peppers, okra, green beans, artichokes, carrots, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and grape leaves, and pulses such as beans (for fasolia), broad beans, peas, black-eyed beans, chick-peas and lentils. Pears, apples, grapes, oranges, Mandarin oranges, nectarines, mespila, blackberries, cherries, strawberries, figs, watermelon, melon, avocado, citrus, lemon, pistachio, almond, chestnut, walnut, hazelnut are some of the commonest of the fruits and nuts.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/cypriot",
            "dishes_count": 11,
            "pictures_count": 11
        },
        {
            "name": "Czech",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Czech Republic, Czechia",
            "description": "Czech cuisine has both influenced and been influenced by the cuisines of surrounding countries. Many of the cakes and pastries that are popular in Central Europe originated within the Czech lands. Contemporary Czech cuisine is more meat-based than in previous periods; the current abundance of farmable meat has enriched its presence in regional cuisine. Traditionally, meat has been reserved for once-weekly consumption, typically on weekends. The body of Czech meals typically consists of two or more courses; the first course is traditionally soup, the second course is the main dish, and the third course can include supplementary courses, such as dessert or compote (kompot). In Czech cuisine, thick soups and many kinds of sauces, both based on stewed or cooked vegetables and meats, often with cream, as well as baked meats with natural sauces (gravies), are popular dishes.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/czech",
            "dishes_count": 26,
            "pictures_count": 28
        },
        {
            "name": "Danish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Denmark",
            "description": "Danish food culture and culinary heritage - has been cultivated and improved for many generations - and is mainly rooted from the old country kitchen - with ancient food recipes from all over the Danish kingdom - created first and foremost - as a shield to protect the Danes against the cold weather conditions in Denmark. That’s why the Danes for centuries have eaten a lot of meat - especially loads of pork - but also beef together with plenty of potatoes and vegetables. Poultry and fish products are the Danes second choice. The cold and often wet climate in Denmark requires a lot of food with high nutritional values that contain many vitamins - minerals and proteins to mobilise a great portion of energy - which is a vital source - needed for work - at school - for sports and another form of daily activities - when living in a dynamic and modern society like Denmark that demands plenty of individual energy and human recourses every day.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/danish",
            "dishes_count": 17,
            "pictures_count": 17
        },
        {
            "name": "Djiboutian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Djibouti",
            "description": "It is consists of a mixture of Somali, Afar, Yemeni, and French cuisine, with some additional South Asian (especially Indian) culinary influences. Meals are typically halal. Several popular dishes feature seafood and meat, including Fah-fah (spicy boiled beef soup).\n\nThe main dish is typically a pancake-like bread called lahoh, which might also be eaten with a stew or soup, such as wat. A side dish of liver (usually beef), goat meat (hilib ari), diced beef cooked in a bed of soup (suqaar), or jerky (oodkac or muqmad), may also be served. Three pieces of lahoh are often eaten along with honey, ghee, and a cup of tea.\n\nLunch (qado) and dinner (casho) are often served with an elaborate main dish of stew (maraq), which comes in a variety of styles and flavors. Rice (bariis) is often served with meat and/or a banana on the side. In Djibouti City, steak and fish are widely consumed. Pasta (baasto) is frequently presented with a heavier stew than the Italian pasta sauce, but is otherwise served in a similar manner as the rice. Grilled meats are frequently eaten with the pasta.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/djiboutian",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Dominican",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Dominican Republic",
            "description": " cuisine is predominantly made up of a combination of Spanish, indigenous Taíno, and African influences. Many Middle-Eastern dishes have been adopted into Dominican cuisine, such as the \"Quipe\" that comes from the Lebanese kibbeh. Dominican cuisine resembles that of other countries in Latin America, those of the nearby islands of Puerto Rico and Cuba, most of all, though the dish names differ sometimes.\n\nA traditional breakfast would consist of mangú, sauteed onions, fried eggs, fried salami, fried cheese and sometimes avocado. This is called \"Los Tres Golpes\" or \"The Three Hits\". As in Spain, the largest, most important meal of the day is lunch. Its most typical form, nicknamed La Bandera (\"The Flag\"), consists of rice, red beans and meat (beef, chicken, pork, or fish), sometimes accompanied by a side of salad.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dominican_Republic_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/dominican",
            "dishes_count": 31,
            "pictures_count": 35
        },
        {
            "name": "Dutch",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Netherland",
            "description": "Dutch cuisine is traditionally quite simple, dominated by the Netherlands strong agricultural industries. Traditionally, Dutch cuisine is simple and straightforward, with many vegetables and little meat; breakfast and lunch are typically bread with toppings like cheese while dinner is meat and potatoes, supplemented with seasonal vegetables.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/dutch",
            "dishes_count": 24,
            "pictures_count": 25
        },
        {
            "name": "-Eastern European-",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Europe, Czech , Hungary, Polish, Russia, Ukrain",
            "description": "Eastern European cuisine is a generic term for the rich tapestry of ethnic cuisines that encompasses many different cultures, ethnicities, languages, and histories of East-Central and Eastern European nations excluding most Balkan countries.\n\nThe cuisine of the region is strongly influenced by its climate and still varies, depending on a country. For example, Belarusian, Czech, Hungarian, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian cuisine show many similarities",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/-eastern_european-",
            "dishes_count": 23,
            "pictures_count": 23
        },
        {
            "name": "East Timorese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "East Timor",
            "description": "The Cuisine of East Timor consists of regional popular foods such as pork, fish, basil, tamarind, legumes, corn, rice, root vegetables, and tropical fruit. East Timorese cuisine has influences from Southeast Asian foods and from Portuguese dishes from its colonisation by Portugal. Flavours and ingredients from other former Portuguese colonies can be found due to the presence of Portuguese soldiers from other colonies in East Timor.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/east_timorese",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Ecuadorian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ecuador",
            "description": "Ecuadorian cuisine is diverse, varying with altitude, and associated agricultural conditions. Pork, chicken, beef, and cuy (guinea pig) are popular in the mountainous regions, and are served with a variety of carbohydrate-rich foods, especially rice, corn, and potatoes. A popular street food in mountainous regions is hornado, consisting of potatoes served with roasted pig. Some examples of Ecuadorian cuisine in general include patacones (unripe plantains fried in oil, mashed up, and then refried), llapingachos (a pan seared potato ball), and seco de chivo (a type of stew made from goat). A wide variety of fresh fruit is available, particularly at lower altitudes, including granadilla, passionfruit, naranjilla, several types of bananas, uvilla, taxo, and tree tomato.\n\nThe food is somewhat different in the southern mountainous areas, featuring typical Loja food such as repe, a soup prepared with green bananas; cecina, roasted pork; and miel con quesillo or \"cuajada\", as dessert. In the rainforest, a dietary staple is the yuca, elsewhere called cassava. The starchy root is peeled and boiled, fried, or used in a variety of other dishes. It's also used as a bread, and has spread throughout the nation, most notably, to Quito where a company sells the native pan de yuca in a new sense; different types sold with frozen yogurt. Many fruits are available in this region, including bananas, tree grapes, and peach palms. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecuadorian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/ecuadorian",
            "dishes_count": 31,
            "pictures_count": 35
        },
        {
            "name": "Egyptian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Egypt",
            "description": "Cuisine from Egypt makes heavy use of legumes, vegetables and fruits since Egypt's rich Nile valley and delta produce large quantities of these crops in high quality.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/egyptian",
            "dishes_count": 31,
            "pictures_count": 33
        },
        {
            "name": "English",
            "othernames": "British",
            "territory": "England",
            "description": "British food has traditionally been based on beef, lamb, pork, chicken and fish and generally served with potatoes and one other vegetable. The most common and typical foods eaten in Britain include the sandwich, fish and chips, pies like the cornish pasty, trifle and roasts dinners.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/english",
            "dishes_count": 88,
            "pictures_count": 91
        },
        {
            "name": "Eritrean",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Eritrea",
            "description": "The Eritrean cuisines shares similarities with the northern half of Ethiopian but with a subtle difference in the foods, given the history of the two countries.\n\nThe main traditional food in Eritrean cuisine is tsebhi (stew), served with taita (flatbread made from teff, wheat, or sorghum), and hilbet (paste made from legumes; mainly lentil and faba beans). A typical traditional Eritrean dish consists of injera accompanied by a spicy stew, which frequently includes beef, goat, lamb or fish. Overall, Eritrean cuisine strongly resembles that of neighboring Ethiopia, although Eritrean cooking tends to feature more seafood than Ethiopian cuisine on account of its coastal location. Eritrean dishes are also frequently lighter in texture than Ethiopian meals as they tend to employ less seasoned butter and spices and more tomatoes, as in the tsebhi dorho delicacy.\n\nAdditionally, owing to its colonial history, cuisine in Eritrea features more Ottoman and Italian influences than are present in Ethiopian cooking, including more pasta specials and greater use of curry powders and cumin. People in Eritrea likewise tend to drink coffee, whereas sweetened tea is preferred in Somalia. Christian Eritreans also drink sowa (a bitter fermented barley) and mies (a fermented honey beverage), while Muslim Eritreans abstain from drinking alcohol.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/eritrean",
            "dishes_count": 0,
            "pictures_count": 0
        },
        {
            "name": "Ethiopian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ethiopia",
            "description": "Ethiopian cuisine characteristically consists of vegetable and often very spicy meat dishes. This is usually in the form of wat (also w'et or wot), a thick stew, served atop injera, a large sourdough flatbread, which is about 50 centimeters (20 inches) in diameter and made out of fermented teff flour. Ethiopians eat exclusively with their right hands, using pieces of injera to pick up bites of entrées and side dishes. Utensils are optional.\n\nThe Ethiopian Orthodox Church prescribes a number of fasting (tsom, Ge'ez: ጾም ṣōm) periods, including Wednesdays, Fridays, and the entire Lenten season, so Ethiopian cuisine contains many dishes that are vegan. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopian_cuisine\n\nBe Siga, Besiga = Meat\nDoro = chicken\nGomen = Collard Greens\nIngudai = mushroom\nTibs = saute\nwat = stew",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/ethiopian",
            "dishes_count": 35,
            "pictures_count": 36
        },
        {
            "name": "European",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Europe",
            "description": "European cuisine, or alternatively Western cuisine, is a generalized term collectively referring to the cuisines of Europe and other Western countries, including (depending on the definition) that of Russia, as well as non-indigenous cuisines of Australasia, the Americas, Southern Africa, and Oceania, which derive substantial influence from European settlers in those regions. The term is used by East Asians to contrast with Asian styles of cooking.[3] (This is analogous to Westerners' referring collectively to the cuisines of East Asian countries as Asian cuisine.) When used by Westerners, the term may sometimes refer more specifically to cuisine in Europe; in this context, a synonym is Continental cuisine, especially in British English.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/european",
            "dishes_count": 63,
            "pictures_count": 63
        },
        {
            "name": "Fijian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Fiji",
            "description": "Traditional Fijian food is a wonderful amalgam of fresh, local ingredients found in the tropics and the traditional preparations and cooking methods passed down the generations. Coconut, fish, rice, taro, sweet potatoes, cassava and breadfruit are the main components in local Fijian dishes.\n\nLovo is a Fijian delicacy prepared for communal events such as weddings and festivals. A makeshift underground oven is fashioned by digging a hole into the ground and lining it with coconut husks, which are then lit on fire and covered by stones. Meats, fish and vegetables wrapped in banana leaves are then placed on top of the heated stones and cooked for about two and a half hours. Most large resorts in Fiji have a lovo night once a week.\n\nAnother national delicacy is kokodo, raw mahi-mahi (a type of fish) marinated in coconut cream, lime, onions and tomatoes. Coconut cream is an important ingredient in two other Fijian delicacies: Rourou, a dish made of taro leaves, and tavioka, a baked dish made of tapioca and mashed bananas. Duruka, an unusual asparagus-like vegetable that is seasonal during the months of April and May, is also a popular traditional Fijian dish. The national drink of Fiji is kava, which was traditionally prepared by virgins, who chewed the root of the pepper plant before mixing it with water, but is now made in a more hygienic fashion: by pounding the root in a wooden bowl.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/fijian",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Filipino",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "The Philippines",
            "description": "Philippine cuisine consists of the food, preparation methods and eating customs found in the Philippines. The style of cooking and the food associated with it have evolved over many centuries from its Austronesian origins to a mixed cuisine of Malay, Spanish, Chinese, and American, as well as other Asian and Latin influences adapted to indigenous ingredients and the local palate.\r\n\r\nDishes range from the very simple, like a meal of fried salted fish and rice, to the elaborate paellas and cocidos created for fiestas of Spanish origin, and spaghetti and lasagna of Italian origin. Popular dishes include: lechón (whole roasted pig), longganisa (Philippine sausage), tapa (cured beef), torta (omelette), adobo (chicken and/or pork braised in garlic, vinegar, oil and soy sauce, or cooked until dry), kaldereta (meat in tomato sauce stew), mechado (larded beef in soy and tomato sauce), puchero (beef in bananas and tomato sauce), afritada (chicken and/or pork simmered in a peanut sauce with vegetables), kare-kare (oxtail and vegetables cooked in peanut sauce), pinakbet (kabocha squash, eggplant, beans, okra, and tomato stew flavored with shrimp paste), crispy pata (deep-fried pig's leg), hamonado (pork sweetened in pineapple sauce), sinigang (meat or seafood in sour broth), pancit (noodles), and lumpia (fresh or fried spring rolls).\r\n-Wikipedia-\r\n\r\nmerienda = breakfast, lunch, snack and \r\nmerienda cena = Dinner\r\nItlog = eggs\r\nPancit, pansit = noodles",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/filipino",
            "dishes_count": 149,
            "pictures_count": 162
        },
        {
            "name": "Finnish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Finland",
            "description": "Cuisine from Finland is notable for generally combining traditional country fare and haute cuisine with contemporary continental style cooking. Fish and meat (usually pork, beef or reindeer) play a prominent role in traditional Finnish dishes in some parts of the country, while the dishes in others have traditionally included various vegetables and mushrooms. Refugees from Karelia contributed to foods in other parts of Finland.\n\nFinnish foods often use wholemeal products (rye, barley, oats) and berries (such as blueberries, lingonberries, cloudberries, and sea buckthorn). Milk and its derivatives like buttermilk are commonly used as food, drink or in various recipes. Various turnips were common in traditional cooking, but were replaced with the potato after its introduction in the 18th century.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/finnish",
            "dishes_count": 50,
            "pictures_count": 50
        },
        {
            "name": "French",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "France",
            "description": "French cuisine (French: cuisine française, IPA: [k?i.zin f??~.s?z]) consists of cooking traditions and practices from France, famous for rich tastes and subtle nuances with a long and rich history. France, a country famous for its agriculture and independently minded peasants, was long a creative powerbase for delicious recipes, that are both healthy and refined. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/french",
            "dishes_count": 156,
            "pictures_count": 167
        },
        {
            "name": "Gabonese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Gabon",
            "description": "This cuisine is the cooking traditions, practices, foods and dishes associated with Gabon, a sovereign state on the west coast of Central Africa. French cuisine is prevalent as a notable influence, and in larger cities various French specialities are available. In rural areas, food staples such as cassava, rice and yams are commonly used.]Meats, when available, including chicken and fish, and bush meats such as antelope, wild boar and monkey. Sauces are often used, with hot red pepper berbere paste being a common example. Fruits include bananas, papayas, guavas, mangoes, pineapples, coconuts, avocado and peanuts. Plantains, tomatoes, corn, and eggplant are also used.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/gabonese",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Georgian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Georgia",
            "description": "Georgian cuisine (Georgian: ქართული სამზარეულო; k’art’uli samzareulo) refers to the cooking styles and dishes that originate in the country of Georgia (along with two breakaway independent states of Abkhazia and South Ossetia) and which are historically prepared by Georgian people around the world. The Georgian cuisine is unique to the country, but also carries some influences from other European and nearby Middle Eastern culinary traditions. Each historical province of Georgia has its own distinct culinary tradition, with variations such as Megrelian, Kakhetian, and Imeretian cuisines. Heavy on meat dishes, the Georgian cuisine also offers a variety of vegetarian dishes.\n\nGeorgian cuisine is the result of the rich interplay of culinary ideas carried along the trade routes by merchants and travelers alike. The importance of both food and drink to Georgian culture is best observed during a feast called supra, when a huge assortment of dishes are prepared, always accompanied by large amounts of wine, and that can last for hours. In a Georgian feast, the role of the tamada (toastmaster) is an important and honoured position.\n\nGeorgian restaurants were prevalent in Russia throughout the 20th century, influenced in part by Joseph Stalin's Georgian ethnicity. In Russia, all major cities have many Georgian restaurants, and Russian restaurants often feature Georgian food items on their menu.\n\nIn countries of the former Soviet Union, Georgian food is also popular due to the immigration of Georgians to other Soviet republics",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/georgian",
            "dishes_count": 27,
            "pictures_count": 27
        },
        {
            "name": "German",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Germany",
            "description": "German cuisine has evolved as a national cuisine through centuries of social and political change with variations from region to region.\n\nThe southern regions of Germany, including Bavaria and neighbouring Swabia, share many dishes. Austrian cuisine is very similar. This originates in common religious and cultural history. Southern Germany and Austria are mainly Catholic, so religious fasting rules for Friday, Lent and Advent, even if no longer widely practiced, have influenced the cuisine.\n\nGermany has the second-highest number of Michelin starred restaurants, after France https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/german",
            "dishes_count": 124,
            "pictures_count": 131
        },
        {
            "name": "German-Bavarian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Bavaria, Germany",
            "description": "Bavarian cuisine includes many meat and Knödel dishes, and often uses flour. Due to its rural conditions and cold climate, only crops such as beets and potatoes do well in Bavaria, being a staple in the German diet.\n\nThe Bavarian dukes, especially the Wittelsbach family, developed Bavarian cuisine and refined it to be presentable to the royal court. This cuisine has belonged to wealthy households, especially in cities, since the 19th century. The (old) Bavarian cuisine is closely connected to Czech cuisine and Austrian cuisine (especially from Tyrol and Salzburg), mainly through the Wittelsbach and Habsburg families. Already, in the beginning, Bavarians were closely connected to their neighbours in Austria through linguistic, cultural and political similarities, which also reflected on the cuisine.\n\nA characteristic Bavarian cuisine was further developed by both groups, with a distinct similarity to Franconian and Swabian cuisine. A Bavarian speciality is the Brotzeit, a savoury snack, which would originally be eaten between breakfast and lunch.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bavarian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/german-bavarian",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Ghanaian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ghana",
            "description": "Ghanaian cuisine is the cuisine of the people Ghana. Ghanaian main dishes are organized around a starchy staple food, with which goes a sauce or soup containing a protein source. The main ingredient for the vast majority of soups and stews is tomatoes. Tinned or fresh tomatoes can be used. Nearly all Ghanaian soups and stews are red or orange in appearance as a result.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/ghanaian",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Greek",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Greece",
            "description": "Greek cuisine is very diverse and although there are many common characteristics among the culinary traditions of different regions within the country, there are also many differences. Greece has an ancient culinary tradition dating back several millennia, and over the centuries Greek cuisine has evolved and absorbed numerous influences and influenced many cuisines itself. Some dishes can be traced back to ancient Greece, some to the Hellenistic and Roman periods, and Byzantium. Many dishes are part of the larger tradition of Ottoman cuisine and their names reveal Arabic, Persian or Turkish roots.\n\nThe most characteristic and ancient element of Greek cuisine is olive oil, which is used in most dishes. Greek cuisine uses some flavorings more often than other Mediterranean cuisines do, namely: oregano, mint, garlic, onion, dill and bay laurel leaves. Other common herbs and spices include basil, thyme and fennel seed. Parsley is also used as a garnish on some dishes.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greek_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/greek",
            "dishes_count": 86,
            "pictures_count": 106
        },
        {
            "name": "Greenlandic",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Greenland",
            "description": "It is traditionally based on meat from marine mammals, game, birds, and fish, and normally contains high levels of protein. Since colonization and the arrival of international trade, the cuisine has been increasingly influenced by Danish and Canadian cuisine.\n\nThe national dish of Greenland is suaasat, a traditional Greenlandic soup. It is often made from seal, or from whale, reindeer, or seabirds. The soup often includes onions and potatoes and is simply seasoned with salt and pepper, or bay leaf. The soup is often thickened with rice, or by soaking barley in the water overnight so that the starches leach into the water.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/greenlandic",
            "dishes_count": 2,
            "pictures_count": 2
        },
        {
            "name": "Guatemalan",
            "othernames": "Maya",
            "territory": "Guatemala",
            "description": "Many traditional foods in Guatemalan cuisine are based on Maya cuisine and prominently feature corn, chilies and beans as key ingredients.\n\nThere are also foods that are commonly eaten on certain days of the week. For example, it is a popular custom to eat paches (a kind of tamale made from potatoes) on Thursday. Certain dishes are also associated with special occasions, such as fiambre for All Saints Day on November 1 and tamales, which are common around Christmas.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/guatemalan",
            "dishes_count": 26,
            "pictures_count": 25
        },
        {
            "name": "Guernsey",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Guernsey",
            "description": "Islanders are passionate about their food and it's not hard to see why - rich in natural ingredients from both the sea and land, Guernsey, and its food, has a unique flavour. Dishes traditional in Guernsey cuisine are the Guernsey gâche, a rich fruit bread, gâche mêlaïe, apple pudding, bean jar, a type of cassoulet of pork and beans, and conger soup.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/guernsey",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Guyanese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Guyana ",
            "description": "This cuisine is similar to the rest of the Anglo Caribbean, especially Trinidad, where the ethnic mix is somewhat similar. Dishes have been adapted to Guyanese tastes, often by the addition of herbs and spices. Unique preparations include Guyana Pepperpot, a stew of Amerindian origin made with meat, cassareep (a bitter extract of the cassava), and seasonings. Other favourites are cassava bread, stews, and Metemgee, a thick rich type of soup with a ground provision, coconut milk and large dumplings (called Duff), eaten with fried fish or chicken. Homemade bread-making, an art in many villages, is a reflection of the British influence that includes pastries such as cheese rolls, pine (pineapple) tarts, and patties. Curry is widely popular in Guyana and most types of meat can be carried: chicken, seafood, goat, lamb, and even duck. Guyanese-style Chow Mein is another dish cooked regularly in many homes.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/guyanese",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Haitian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Haiti",
            "description": "Haitian cuisine consists of cooking traditions and practices from Haiti. While the cuisine is unpretentious and simple, the flavours are of a bold and spicy nature that demonstrate a primary influence of African culinary aesthetic, paired with a very French sophistication with notable derivatives coming from native Taíno and Spanish techniques.\nHaitian cuisine is often lumped together with other regional islands as \"Caribbean cuisine,\" however it maintains an independently unique flavor. It involves the extensive use of herbs, and the liberal use of peppers. A typical dish would probably be a plate of riz collé aux pois (diri kole ak pwa), which is rice with red kidney beans (pinto beans are often used as well) glazed with a marinade as a sauce and topped off with red snapper, tomatoes and onions. It is often called the Riz National, considered to be the national rice of Haiti. The dish can be accompanied by bouillon. Bouillon is a hearty soup consisting of various spices, potatoes, tomatoes, and meats such as goat or beef. Dishes vary by region.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haitian_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/haitian",
            "dishes_count": 5,
            "pictures_count": 5
        },
        {
            "name": "Hawaiian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Hawaii",
            "description": "The cuisine of Hawaii incorporates five distinct styles of food reflecting the diverse food history of settlement and immigration in the Hawaiian Islands. In the pre-contact period of Ancient Hawaii (300 AD–1778), Polynesian voyagers brought plants and animals to the Islands. As Native Hawaiians settled the area, they fished, raised taro for poi, planted coconuts, sugarcane, sweet potatoes and yams, and cooked meat and fish in earth ovens. After first contact in 1778, European and American cuisine arrived along with missionaries and whalers, who introduced their own foods and built large sugarcane plantations. Christian missionaries brought New England cuisine while whalers introduced salted fish which eventually transformed into the side dish lomilomi salmon.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/hawaiian",
            "dishes_count": 14,
            "pictures_count": 14
        },
        {
            "name": "Honduran",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Honduras",
            "description": "Honduran cuisine is a fusion of indigenous (Lenca) cuisine, Spanish cuisine, Caribbean cuisine and African cuisine. There are also dishes from the Garifuna people. Coconut and coconut milk are featured in both sweet and savory dishes. Regional specialties include fried fish, tamales, carne asada and baleadas. Other popular dishes include: meat roasted with chismol and carne asada, chicken with rice and corn, and fried fish with pickled onions and jalapeños. In the coastal areas and in the Bay Islands, seafood and some meats are prepared in many ways, some of which include coconut milk.\n\nAmong the soups the Hondurans enjoy are bean soup, mondongo soup (tripe soup), seafood soups and beef soups. Generally all of these soups are mixed with plantains, yuca, and cabbage, and served with corn tortillas.\n\nOther typical dishes are the montucas or corn tamale, stuffed tortillas, and tamales wrapped in plantain leaves. Also part of Honduran typical dishes is an abundant selection of tropical fruits such as papaya, pineapple, plum, sapote, passion fruit and bananas which are prepared in many ways while they are still green.\n\nSoft drinks are often drunk with dinner or lunch.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honduran_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/honduran",
            "dishes_count": 7,
            "pictures_count": 7
        },
        {
            "name": "Hong Kong",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Hong Kong",
            "description": "Hong Kong cuisine is mainly influenced by Cantonese cuisine, non-Cantonese Chinese cuisine (especially Teochew, and Hakka, Hokkien and the Jiangsu & Zhejiang), the Western world, Japan, and Southeast Asia, due to Hong Kong's past as a British colony and long history of being an international city of commerce. From the roadside stalls to the most upscale restaurants, Hong Kong provides an unlimited variety of food in every class. Complex combinations and international gourmet expertise have given Hong Kong the reputable labels of \"Gourmet Paradise\" and \"World's Fair of Food\"",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/hong_kong",
            "dishes_count": 18,
            "pictures_count": 18
        },
        {
            "name": "Hungarian",
            "othernames": "Magyar",
            "territory": "Hungary",
            "description": "The cuisine characteristic of the nation of Hungary and its primary ethnic group, the Magyars. Traditional Hungarian dishes are primarily based on meats, seasonal vegetables, fruits, fresh bread, dairy products and cheeses.\n\nHungarians are especially passionate about their meat stews, casseroles, steaks, roasted pork, beef, poultry, lamb and game. The mixing of different varieties of meats is a traditional feature of Hungarian cuisine. Goulash, stuffed peppers, cabbage rolls, and Fatányéros (Hungarian mixed grill on a wooden platter) are all dishes that can combine beef and pork, and sometimes mutton. Goulash is a stew with more gravy or a soup using meat with bones, paprika, caraway, vegetables (typically carrots and parsley root) and potatoes or various tiny dumplings or pasta simmered with the meat. Other famous Hungarian meat stews include paprikás, a paprika stew with meat simmered in thick creamy paprika gravy, and pörkölt, a Hungarian stew with boneless meat (usually beef or pork), onion, and sweet paprika powder, both served with nokedli (small dumplings). In old fashioned dishes, fruits such as plums and apricots are cooked with meat or in piquant sauces/stuffings for game, roasts and other cuts. Various kinds of noodles and dumplings, potatoes, and rice are commonly served as a side dish. Hungarian sausages (kolbász) and winter salami are a major part of Hungarian cuisine.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/hungarian",
            "dishes_count": 24,
            "pictures_count": 25
        },
        {
            "name": "Icelandic",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Iceland",
            "description": "The cuisine of Iceland has a long history. Important parts of Icelandic cuisine are lamb, dairy, and fish, the latter due to Iceland's being surrounded by ocean. Popular foods in Iceland include skyr, hangikjöt (smoked lamb), kleinur, laufabrauð and bollur. Þorramatur is a traditional buffet served at midwinter festivals called Þorrablót; it includes a selection of traditionally cured meat and fish products served with rúgbrauð (dense dark and sweet rye bread) and brennivín (an Icelandic akvavit). The flavours of this traditional country food originate in its preservation methods; pickling in fermented whey or brine, drying and smoking.\n\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Icelandic_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/icelandic",
            "dishes_count": 16,
            "pictures_count": 16
        },
        {
            "name": "I-kiribati",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Kiribati",
            "description": "The most important dish in Kiribati is rice which is generally served with most meals. A very simple dish is that prepared with fish of different sizes from the sea. Food in Kiribati also consists of fish and seafood, such as fresh shellfish, crabs, and shrimps. Except these tasty dishes, people from Kiribati use all sorts of sauces and spices. Seafood is very tasty if it is left uncooked in a vinaigrette matrix, grilled, and even stuffed with onions wrapped in banana leaves. In Kiribati exotic dishes are based on coconut and coconut milk that are great in cooking meat and vegetable dishes. More than this, coconuts are used in creating mouth-watering desserts like macapuno or thick dessert jam, bibingka or pudding made of rice, coconut milk, Sugar and eggs.",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/i-kiribati",
            "dishes_count": 1,
            "pictures_count": 1
        },
        {
            "name": "Indian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "India",
            "description": "Indian cuisine encompasses a wide variety of regional cuisines native to india. given the range of diversity in soil type, climate and occupations, these cuisines vary significantly from each other and use locally available spices, herbs, vegetables and fruits. indian food is also heavily influenced by religious and cultural choices and traditions.\n\nthe development of these cuisines have been shaped by dharmic beliefs, and in particular by vegetarianism, which is a growing dietary trend in indian society. there has also been central asian influence on north indian cuisine from the years of mughal rule. indian cuisine has been and is still evolving, as a result of the nation's cultural interactions with other societies.\n\nhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/indian_cuisine\n\nAloo = Potato\nAṇḍā,अंडा = Egg\nChana = chickpeas\nDal = Lentil\nḌēyarī, डेयरी = Dairy\nGobi = cauliflower\nGosht = Meat\nHanī, हनी = Honey\nkeema, qeema = Minced meat\nMasala = Mixture of spices ground into a paste or powder\nManasā = Meat, मनसा\nMattar-Rudhrapur = Green Peas\nPalak =  Spinach\nPaneer, Panīra, पनीर = Paneer cheese, fresh cheese\nPōlṭrī, पोल्ट्री = Poultry\nRajma = red kidney beans\nSaag = Spinach\nSamudrī bhōjana = Seafood, समुद्री भोजन\nTikki = cutlet or croquette\nUrad = black lentil\n",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/indian",
            "dishes_count": 293,
            "pictures_count": 364
        },
        {
            "name": "Indian-Chinese",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "India, China",
            "description": "Adaptation of Chinese seasoning and cooking techniques to Indian tastes through a larger offering of vegetarian dishes. The Indian Chinese cuisine is said to have been developed by the small Chinese community that has lived in Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) for over a century. Today, Chinese food is an integral part of the Indian culinary scene. It is also enjoyed by Indian and Chinese communities in Malaysia, Singapore and North America. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Chinese_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/indian-chinese",
            "dishes_count": 6,
            "pictures_count": 11
        },
        {
            "name": "Indonesian",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Indonesia",
            "description": "Indonesian cuisine is one of the most vibrant and colorful cuisines in the world, full of intense flavor. It is diverse, in part because Indonesia is composed of approximately 6,000 populated islands of the total 18,000 in the world's largest archipelago, with more than 300 ethnic groups calling Indonesia their home. Many regional cuisines exist, often based upon indigenous culture and foreign influences. Indonesia has around 5,350 traditional recipes, with 30 of them considered the most important.\n\nIn 2011, Indonesian cuisine began to gain worldwide recognition, with three of its popular dishes make it to the list of 'World's 50 Most Delicious Foods (Readers' Pick)', a worldwide online poll by 35,000 people held by CNN International. Rendang top the list as the number one, followed closely by nasi goreng in number two, and satay in number fourteen.\n\nIndonesian cuisine varies greatly by region and has many different influences. Sumatran cuisine, for example, often has Middle Eastern and Indian influences, featuring curried meat and vegetables such as gulai and kari, while Javanese cuisine is mostly indigenous, with some hint of Chinese influence. The cuisines of Eastern Indonesia are similar to Polynesian and Melanesian cuisine. Elements of Chinese cuisine can be seen in Indonesian cuisine: foods such as bakmi (noodles), bakso (meat or fish balls), and lumpia (spring rolls) have been completely assimilated.\n\nNasi = Rice",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/indonesian",
            "dishes_count": 68,
            "pictures_count": 75
        },
        {
            "name": "Iranian",
            "othernames": "Persian",
            "territory": "Iran",
            "description": "Iranian food (also referred to as Persian food) is some of the most delicious and fresh in its region. It is also quite healthy, using only small amounts of red meat (usually lamb or beef), emphasizing larger amounts of grains (especially rice), fruits, and vegetables. Although it is often lumped under the category of general \"Middle Eastern\" fare, the Iranian cuisine is able to retain its uniqueness in a variety of ways. One of these ways is preparing meals with contrasting flavors, such as a\n\nRead more: http://www.foodbycountry.com/Germany-to-Japan/Iran.html#ixzz40r0myhOc",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/iranian",
            "dishes_count": 71,
            "pictures_count": 71
        },
        {
            "name": "Iraqi",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Irac",
            "description": "Iraqi cuisine or Mesopotamian cuisine has a long history going back some 10,000 years – to the Sumerians, Akkadians, Babylonians, Assyrians, and ancient Persians. Tablets found in ancient ruins in Iraq show recipes prepared in the temples during religious festivals – the first cookbooks in the world. Ancient Iraq, or Mesopotamia, was home to a sophisticated and highly advanced civilization, in all fields of knowledge, including the culinary arts. However, it was in the Islamic Golden Age when Baghdad was the capital of the Abbasid Caliphate (750–1258) that the Iraqi kitchen reached its zenith. Today, the cuisine of Iraq reflects this rich inheritance as well as strong influences from the culinary traditions of neighbouring Iran (aka Persia), Turkey and the Syria region area. \n\nMeals begin with appetizers and salads – known as Mezza. Some dishes include Kebab (often marinated with garlic, lemon and spices, then grilled), Gauss (grilled meat sandwich wrap, similar to Döner kebab), Bamieh (lamb, okra and tomato stew), Quzi (lamb with rice, almonds, raisins and spices), Falafel (fried chickpea patties served with amba and salad in pita), Kubbah (minced meat ground with bulghur wheat or rice and spices), Masgûf (grilled fish with pepper and tamarind), and Maqluba (a rice, lamb, tomato and aubergine dish). Stuffed vegetable dishes such as Dolma and Mahshi are also popular.\n\nContemporary Iraq reflects the same natural division as ancient Mesopotamia, which consisted of Assyria in the arid northern uplands and Babylonia in the southern alluvial plain. Al-Jazira (the ancient Assyria) grows wheat and crops requiring winter chill such as apples and stone fruits. Al-Irāq (Iraq proper, the ancient Babylonia) grows rice and barley, citrus fruits, and is responsible for Iraq's position as the world's largest producer of dates.\n\n(Wikipedia)",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/iraqi",
            "dishes_count": 28,
            "pictures_count": 30
        },
        {
            "name": "Irish",
            "othernames": "",
            "territory": "Ireland",
            "description": "Irish cuisine is a style of cooking originating from Ireland or developed by Irish people. It evolved from centuries of social and political change and mixing between the different cultures on the island, predominantly English and Irish. \n\nThe cuisine takes its influence from the crops grown and animals farmed in its temperate climate. However, the development of Irish cuisine was distorted by the English conquest in the early 17th century because this forced the impoverishment of the mass of the people through land dispossession and the organisation of Irelands economy to provide supplies to England and its armed forces. This also replaced the upper levels of cuisine with English norms. Consequently, the potato, after its widespread adoption in the 18th century became almost the only food of the poor (the vast majority of the population) and, as a result, is often now closely associated with Ireland. Many elements of Irish cuisine were lost during this time and particularly from the Famine up until the late 20th century, but are now being revived. Representative modern Irish dishes include Irish stew, bacon and cabbage, boxty, coddle, and colcannon.\nhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_cuisine",
            "uri": "https://www.worldfood.guide/cuisine/irish",
            "dishes_count": 47,
            "pictures_count": 45
        }
    ]
}